catechin

(redirected from Catechins)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

cat·e·chin

(kat'ĕ-kin),
A derivative of catechu and used as an astringent in diarrhea and as a stain.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

catechin

(kăt′ĭ-kĭn′)
n.
1. A flavonoid, C15H14O6, originally derived from catechu, found in various foods such as green tea, cacao, and many fruits, and used in tanning and dyeing.
2. Any of various isomers or derivatives of this compound. In both senses also called catechol.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The most abundant catechin in green tea is epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), accounting for as much as 65% of all green tea catechins.
Langmuir and Freundlich models adequately described the isothermal adsorption of the catechins onto the rice bran.
The objectives of this study are (1) to investigate the effects of variety, region, and season on theaflavins content of Congou black tea and (2) to determine the influences of the enzyme activity and catechins content on theaflavins content of black tea during tea processing.
One patient of 13-year-old girl received heart transplant after taking catechin for 3 months due to her very serious condition.
Extensive investigations on catechin and its derivatives have shown that they possess many beneficial properties including radical scavenging, metal chelation, and anticarcinogenic and anti-inflammatory activity.
We have shown that the anti-stress effect of theanine was blocked by caffeine and catechins, two other main components of tea (Unno et al., 2013a).
In conjunction, the data from in vitro and in vivo studies suggest green tea catechins, in particularly EGCG, exert anti-obesity effects via several mechanisms including inhibition of adipocyte differentiation and proliferation, reduction of fat absorption and fat mass, tricylglycerides, free fatty acids and total cholesterol.
The four major polyphenolic catechins present in green tea include: ECG [(-)EpiCatechin-3-O-Gallate]; GCG [(-)GalloCatechin-3-O-Gallate]; EGC [(-)EpiGalloCatechin]; and EGCG [(-)EpiGalloCatechin-3-O-Gallate], the most abundant and biologically active green tea constituent.
Green tea beverages enriched with catechins with a galloyl moiety reduce body fat in moderately obese adults: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial.
The company stated that Phytofare is a green-tea derived extract unique in that it contains all eight major catechins found in green tea while also delivering ten times greater bioavailability over generic green tea extracts.
Green tea and its main components, the catechins, including EGCG, are thought to influence body weight through mechanisms of thermogenesis and fat oxidation.