catastrophism

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catastrophism

the thesis that fossil beds represented catastrophic MASS EXTINCTIONS so that the fossil record showed a series of separate creations, each followed by a mass mortality. Held largely in the 18th and 19th centuries, this idea lost support with the development of evolutionary theory in the 20th century.
References in periodicals archive ?
Crises, whether economic or ecological, rarely produce the profound change promised by the catastrophists.
The first three writers named as Mary's favorites are all catastrophists, who tended to deny theories of evolution and to support the idea that the scriptural account of Creation is accurate, if compressed.
Furthermore, concerns about severe climate harms are not just the pipe dreams of catastrophists.
Had Boro been on the brink, as the catastrophists claim surely they would have cashed in on Leroy Lita and Andrew Taylor.
Climate deniers and catastrophists alike insist that 'there is no alternative' to Brundtland's (1987) environmental stewardship via economic growth and 'trickle down'.
Catastrophists claimed massive, sudden and violent events caused geological changes.
The Canadian environmentalist and columnist Lawrence Solomon, of the National Post and the Toronto Financial Post, has written a series of columns in the last few years on the subject of scientists who have developed research data that refute many of the claims of the warming catastrophists.
Catastrophists were viewed as scientists who invoked supernatural causes, and catastrophic thinking was closely linked, in many people's minds, with biblical literalism.
After an informative introduction in which Smil positions himself firmly in the middle ground between the catastrophists (such as Lester Brown and Paul Ehrlich) and the cornucopians (such as Julian Simon), the subsequent chapters deal with: (i) demographic and dietary concerns about future food supplies; (ii) the foundations of agroecosystems; (iii) the biophysical underpinnings of food production; (iv) agricultural intensification, especially through the more efficient use of resources such as irrigation water; (v) the importance and roles of animal feed and foods; (vi) food flows and losses beyond the farm gate; (vii) human nutritional needs; (viii) dietary changes; and (ix) China's capacity to feed itself.
In a feisty and systemic style, University of Manitoba geographer Vaclav Smil questions both catastrophists and techno-optimists in Feeding the World, a unique book that considers the entire food chain and numerous ways to reduce inefficiencies.
Drawing on a long religious tradition of divine (or not so divine) intervention, the Catastrophists saw the history of Earth as a series of cataclysmic changes ranging from the Flood to the Apocalypse.