disaster

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disaster

 [dĭ-zas´ter]
a situation that produces damage and varying amounts of destruction; there is a three-tiered classification for disasters, based on the number of casualties. See also emergency.

disaster

Etymology: L, dis, apart, astrum, a star
any mishap or misfortune that is ruinous, distressing, or calamitous.
Global village A cataclysmic event in which there is a loss of multiple lives and/or major property damage
Nuclear physics Decay disaster
Public health Any unanticipated event that requires urgent response to bring people and/or property out of harm’s way in order to minimise loss of life or destruction of property

disaster

Public health Any unanticipated event that requires urgent response, bringing people and/or property out of harm's way in order to minimize loss of life or destruction of property; disasters are described by certain parameters Vox populi A cataclysmic event in which there is a loss of multiple lives and/or major property damage. See Climatologic disaster, Geological disaster, Man-made disaster, Natural disaster, Tsunami.
Disaster classifications
Nature, ie either
1. Natural, geophysical–eg earthquakes, volcanoes or weather-related–eg floods, hurricanes.
2. Man-made–transportation-related, structural collapse, war, hazardous materials, explosions, fires
Location Single site–eg explosion or multiple sites–eg hurricanes
Predictability Regular–eg hurricane season or sporadic–eg toxic spill
Onset Gradual–eg armed conflict or abrupt–eg accident
Duration Brief–eg natural disaster or extended–eg armed conflict
Frequency Often–eg flood, or rare–eg fire
.

DISASTER

(di-zas'tĕr)
An acronymic paradigm developed by the American Medical Association to assist in organizing the reaction to a mass-casualty incident. The components of the acronym are D for disaster, I for incident command, S for scene security and safety, A for assess hazards, S for support, T for triage and treatment, E for evacuation, and R for recovery.
References in periodicals archive ?
A more likely development is growth in contingent financing arrangements - for example, Act of God bonds - which would provide contingent access to new debt financing or reduce, delay, or eliminate service requirements and/or the obligation to repay existing debt in the event of large catastrophe losses.
Clark founded the catastrophe modeling industry after identifying a need for probabilistic modeling techniques and better catastrophe risk assessment tools for the insurance industry.
Access to many of the most severely damaged neighborhoods was delayed as civil authorities cordoned off areas deemed unsafe, again forcing insurers to reverse typical catastrophe response practices of working outward from the most severely to the least impacted communities.
Aggregate policyholders' surplus, the measure of insurance capacity, increased sharply in 2006 as a result of strong pricing and few catastrophe losses.
Recent catastrophes notwithstanding, reinsurers are seeing a shift in focus in property coverage from pricing to negotiations over terms and conditions, said Mooney.
As the founder of AIR Worldwide, Karen Clark is an internationally recognized expert in the field of catastrophe risk modeling.
Another seminar, "Predicting the Future: Catastrophe Modeling," reviewed the latest on catastrophe modeling of natural and man-made hazards.
Offsetting these positive attributes are Balboa's significant aggregate exposure to catastrophe losses and its elevated underwriting leverage, primarily due to premium growth.
The three most important pieces of any catastrophe contingency plan are personnel, facilities and vendors.
Economic losses from natural catastrophes rose to $60 billion from $55 billion in 2002, resulting mainly from tornadoes, heat waves and forest tires, plus severe floods in Asia and Europe.
The innovative nature of this transaction underscores our ability to leverage our deep catastrophe reinsurance experience, market knowledge and new forms of non-traditional capacity to our clients' advantage," said Geoff Bromley, Guy Carpenter's Chairman of European and Asian operations.
The fourth quarter kicked off with the largest catastrophe losses of the year, and what may yet prove to be the costliest fire disaster in U.