catastrophe theory


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Related to catastrophe theory: Chaos theory

catastrophe theory

a branch of mathematics that deals with large changes in the total system resulting from small changes in a critical variable in the system; some epidemics, gene frequencies, and the social behavior of populations may be explained by this theory.

catastrophe theory

a set of mathematical theorems employed in the modelling of discontinuities in the physical world, that result when gradually changing and interacting variables reach a critical point. Applied in sportpsychology to the understanding of sudden decrements or increments in performance, incorporating changes in cognitive anxiety, physiological arousal and self-confidence.

catastrophe theory

the mathematical basis for the study of large changes in a total system which may result from small changes in a critical variable in the system.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the requirement of catastrophe theory, before the analysis and evaluation, the normalized function formula should be used to change the heterogeneous variables into homogeneous variables and the data should be normalized to a dimensionless value between o and 1.
Based on cusp catastrophe theory, the characteristics of cusp catastrophe function [e.
Catastrophe theory originated by the mathematician Rene Thom is consolidated in 1977 with his book "Structural Stability and Morphogenesis".
2013,APHIDSim: A population dynamics model for wheat aphids based on swallowtail catastrophe theory.
They know what's at stake--and they read catastrophe theory, too.
A team of Mexican and US scientists hopes to uncover new evidence to support the catastrophe theory of dinosaur extinction by re-examining the 200-kilometre wide Chicxulub crater in Mexico's Yucatan peninsula.
To establish an alternative to established modes of conflict resolution, we will turn to the theoretical insights of chaos, catastrophe theory, and psychoanalytic semiotics.
Catastrophe theory is used to describe sudden, discontinuous transitions, eg, the sudden change from the "not fighting" to the "fighting" state among siblings.
Lass simply dismisses possible applications of catastrophe theory to phonological change.
Mathematical economists specializing in systems analysis, chaos, and catastrophe theory and economists critical of equilibrium approaches will see Russian transition as a challenging application.
This is exactly the opposite, of course, of the catastrophe theory that a number of people, myself included, have been recently arguing.
In the language of catastrophe theory, S is the "slow variable" and price the "fast" variable.