castor oil

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castor oil

 [kas´ter]
a fixed oil obtained from the seed of the castor bean plant (Ricinus communis); now used primarily as a topical emollient. When taken internally it acts as a powerful cathartic; because of its strength, other agents are now preferred for treatment of digestive disorders.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cas·tor oil

(kas'ter oyl),
A fixed oil expressed from the seeds of Ricinus communis (family Euphorbiaceae); a purgative.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

castor oil

n.
A colorless or pale yellowish oil extracted from the seeds of the castor-oil plant, used pharmaceutically as a laxative and skin softener and industrially as a lubricant.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

castor oil

An oil cold-pressed from the kernel of Ricinus communis seeds, which contains glycerides of ricinoleic and isoricinoleic acids—e.g., dihydroxystearin, isoricinolein, palmitin and triricinolein; it has been used externally as an emollient and internally as a laxative.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

castor oil

An oil cold-pressed from the kernel of Ricinus communis seeds, which contains glycerides of ricinoleic and isoricinoleic acids–eg, dihydroxystearin, isoricinolein, palmitin, and triricinolein; it has been used externally as an emollient and internally as a laxative. See Castor bean, Ricin.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cas·tor oil

(kas'tŏr oyl)
Fatty oil from castor beans used as a cathartic or lubricant.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

castor oil

An oil derived from the poisonous seeds of the plant, Ricinus communis and formerly used to treat CONSTIPATION.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Another one of the objectives to be attained is the identification and characterization of specific regulatory genetic sequences, called promoters, which drive the expression of such genes to the seeds of castor-oil transgenic plants.
With such modification, in the case of castor-oil plants, the idea is for fatty oils to get accumulated in the seed without affecting other parts of the plant, thus avoiding negative agronomic effects.
"The cultivation of the castor-oil plant to extract a biodiesel is part of the Brazilian government objective of stimulating the production of biofuels," said Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture official Cezar Martins da Rocha.
What you have is the so-called false castor-oil plant, Fatsia japonica.