castor bean

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Related to Castor oil plant: ricin, castor bean plant, castor beans

Ricinus

(ris'i-nŭs),
A genus of plants (family Euphorbiaceae) with one species, Ricinus communis, the castor oil plant, the source of castor oil; the leaves are said to be a galactagogue.
Synonym(s): castor bean
[L.]

castor bean

n.
1. The castor-oil plant.
2. The poisonous seed of the castor-oil plant, from which castor oil is obtained.

castor bean

Herbal medicine
The kernel of the seeds of Ricinus communis, which contain the highly toxic ricin and ricinine.

cas·tor bean

(kast'ŏr bēn)
Herbal agent made from the seed of Ricinus communis; widely used as a cathartic laxative; overdosage can produce gastrointestinal problems.
Synonym(s): Mexico seed, pei-ma.

castor bean

References in periodicals archive ?
These were obtained from 14 adult plant variables (Group I) and from 10 bean production variables (Group II) of the castor oil plant hybrid Lyra.
Castor oil plant has been used as a barrier within fields of crops or around houses to repel insects.
Leaves of castor oil plants (cultivars BRS Energia and BRS Paraguacu) were collected and subjected to different nitrogen doses at a stage of full development before flowering to measure the photosynthetic pigments with portable equipment and to extract them using a classical model.
We have identified three salt tolerant plants including Jatropha, Salicornia and Castor oil plant which could grow in salt marshes on sea beaches and could even sustain for five years without water.
To make interesting personalised dining table name 'cards' use a gold pen and write your guests names on lush green castor oil plant leafs.
Fatsia japonica, also known as the castor oil plant or aralia, has fantastic shining leaves measuring more than 1ft across and is particularly suitable for seaside gardens or as a specimen bush in a city garden.
The Castor oil plant, Ricinus communis,is another plant we will use as dot plants.
Q I HAVE a healthy castor oil plant which is about 4ft high and stands on a table in a north-facing window.
These include all the spurges (Euphorbia), delphiniums, monkshood (Aconitum), the flamboyant castor oil plant (Ricinus communis), foxgloves (Digitalis), lily of the valley (Convallaria majalis), morning glory (Ipomea) and Laburnum.
It is, of course oil extracted from the large seeds of the castor oil plant, Ricinus communis.
Also known as the castor oil plant, this tropical-looking evergreen with its fantastic deep-green, leathery leaves looks great when other plants around it have faded.