Castleman's disease


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Castleman's disease

[kas′əlmənz]
Etymology: Benjamin Castleman, American pathologist, 1906-1982
a condition resembling lymphoma but without recognizable malignant cells, characterized by isolated masses of lymphoid tissue and lymph node hyperplasia, usually in the abdominal or mediastinal area. One variety has numerous small germinal centers near blood vessels with vascular proliferation; a second type consists of sheets of plasma cells and fewer but larger germinal centers. The disease may be either benign or premalignant and overlap with autoimmune diseases. Also called benign giant lymph node hyperplasia.

Castleman's disease

A heterogeneous group of idiopathic, multicentric lymphoproliferative disorders primarily of young adults Clinical Hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy Lab ↑ IL-6 in serum and tissues, anemia, hypoalbuminemia, hypergammaglobulinemia Management Surgical resection
References in periodicals archive ?
Aetiology is not well understood however association with Castleman's disease and Epstein Barr virus has been reported.
Multicentric Castleman's disease with abundant IgG4-positive cells: a clinical and pathological analysis of six cases.
Castleman's disease (CD) is a rare lymphoproliferative syndrome typically involving a mediastinal mass.
Excisional biopsy was performed and the histopathology showed the lesion to be hyalinized vascular type of castleman's disease.
Castleman's disease is a rare benign lymphoproliferative disorder of unknown aetiology and pathogenesis that primarily affects lymph nodes.
Castleman's disease commonly involves mediastinum and hence it is thoracic in most of the reported cases.
Systemic IgG4-related lymphadenopathy: a clinical and pathologic comparison to multicentric Castleman's disease.
Castleman's disease (CD) is a non-clonal lymph node hyperplasia and was first described in 1956 by Benjamin Castleman and colleagues.
Other features of Castleman's disease included the 'onion skin' arrangement of the surrounding lymphocyte (Fig.
Today s approval of a treatment for patients with multicentric Castleman's disease marks a significant milestone for patients living with this rare disease and underscores the importance of ongoing research and development in areas where there are so few patients with such a high unmet medical need, said Peter L.
Castleman's disease is an uncommon benign lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by hypervascular lymphoid hyperplasia.