inflection

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inflection

 [in´flek-shun]
the act of bending inward, or the state of being bent inward.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·flec·tion

, inflexion (in-flek'shŭn),
1. An inward bending.
2. Obsolete term for diffraction.
[L. in-flecto, pp. -flexus, to bend]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

in·flec·tion

, inflexion (in-flek'shŭn)
An inward bending.
[L. in-flecto, pp. -flexus, to bend]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
First, the highly inflected character of Old English was replaced by a weaker, more regular inflectional system, in which many of the different case endings of Old English were reduced to a weakly accented and nondifferentiating - e.
63: Epenthetic vowels are often found between possessive affixes and case endings. For the second person singular, the Bindevokal -u- is also found between the possessive morpheme and the directive case, as in passithe=v=u=da "to your messenger" (Mitt, i 53).
It is probably that once the absolute declension of all Northern Samoyedic languages included three grammatical cases with the following suffixes: Singular (case endings) Plural (numerical markers) Nominative - *-t Accusative *-m *-i Genitive *-n *-i-t
Chapter 3, on morphology, ranges over such matters as changes of gender ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.]) and changes in usage in case endings, as in the genitive singular (caxapa/caxapy), prepositional singular ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.]), and nominative plural ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.]) of masculine nouns.
In the same chapter the forms of the dative and accusative case endings are not listed but must be inferred from the sentences used to illustrate them (presumably -k(k)u and-ai, respectively) (p.