common carotid artery

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Related to Carotid vessels: carotid bifurcation, A carotis communis

com·mon ca·rot·id ar·ter·y

[TA]
origin, right from brachiocephalic, left from arch of aorta; runs superiorly in the neck and divides opposite upper border of thyroid cartilage (C-4 vertebral level) into terminal branches, external and internal carotid.
Synonym(s): arteria carotis communis [TA]

common carotid artery

Etymology: L, communis + Gk, karos, heavy sleep, arteria, airpipe
one of the major arteries supplying blood to the head and neck. Each divides into an external carotid and an internal carotid. Branches of the external carotid supply the face, scalp, and most of the neck and throat tissues. The internal carotids supply the brain and other tissues generally accessible from within the skull, as the eyes.

com·mon ca·rot·id ar·te·ry

(kom'ŏn kă-rot'id ahr'tĕr-ē) [TA]
Origin, right from brachiocephalic, left from arch of aorta; runs upward in the neck and divides opposite upper border of thyroid cartilage (C-4 vertebral level) into terminal branches, external and internal carotid.
Synonym(s): arteria carotis communis.

common carotid artery

A major artery to the head. The left common carotid usually arises from the aortic arch proximal to the left subclavian; the right common carotid is a branch of the brachiocephalic artery. Each common carotid artery runs rostrally in the carotid sheath and enters the neck (behind the sternocleidomastoid muscle) without branching; in the neck, between the level of the top of the trachea and the floor of the mouth, each common carotid artery divides into an internal and an external carotid artery.
See: head (Arteries and veins of the head)aorta (Branches of aorta)heart (The heart) for illus.
See also: artery
References in periodicals archive ?
Interventional cardiologists accustomed to working in the coronary arteries will find the carotid vessels much larger and less prone to in-stent restenosis.
For years, however, researchers in North America and Europe have tried to determine the most effective method to treat narrowed or partially blocked carotid vessels.
Because the diagnosis was still unclear, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed, but it showed that the size and position of the carotid vessels on both sides were normal (figure 2).
1) However, it has been postulated that incomplete straightening of the carotid vessels enables the embryonic angulation to persist, resulting in congenitally tortuous or aberrant internal carotid arteries in the retropharyngeal space.
Carotid catheter angiography demonstrated the typical splaying of the carotid vessels (lyre sign) (figure 2, B).
Close endoscopic examination must be performed to look for evidence of visible pulsations, which might reflect a dangerous proximity of the pharyngeal walls to the carotid vessels.