Linnaean

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Linnaean

also

Linnean

(lĭ-nē′ən)
adj.
Of or relating to Carl Linnaeus or to the system of taxonomic classification and binomial nomenclature that he originated.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Linnaean

Pertaining to the system of taxonomic classification and the binomial nomenclature widely used in medicine, in which the name of the genus (generic name) is followed by the name of the species (specific name). Examples are Staphylococcus aureus and Fasciola hepatica. (Carolus Linnaeus, or Carl von Linne, 1707–78, Swedish biologist)
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
This graphing and decoding demanded a kaleidoscopic, rhizomic, creative, relation-based insight which was not binomial (as Carolus Linnaeus opined in the early eighteenth century).
By the 17th century, when chocolate was introduced to London, the wealthy were prepared to pay the staggering equivalent of pounds 500 for a pound, and when Swedish botanist Carolus Linnaeus classified the cocoa bush, he christened it Theobroma cacao - meaning ``food of the gods''.
Since the current hierarchical, binomial classification was introduced by Carolus Linnaeus 250 years ago, 10 percent, at a guess, of the species of organisms have been described.
At the height of colonization in the 18th century, botanist Carolus Linnaeus identified four racial groups: americanus, "reddish, obstinate, and regulated by custom"; asiaticus, "sallow, severe, and ruled by opinion"; africanus, "black, crafty, and governed by caprice"; and europaeus, "white, gentle, and governed by law." The terminology and the dividing lines between "races" shift in every age and political era.
His stories frequently involve historical figures (often from the Enlightenment), and often these figures are either artists or scientists, such as Benjamin Franklin, Carolus Linnaeus, William Herschel, and Franz Joseph Haydn.
These notecards reveal that the biographer had moved on to new subjects: the dour Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen; the eighteenth-century Swedish botanist and taxonomist Carolus Linnaeus; and Francis Galton, cousin of Charles Darwin, founder of the eugenics movement, and inventor of fingerprinting.
Carolus Linnaeus in his Systema Naturae (1735), gave the generic name Camellia, honoring Camellus, to the genus of plants that was known in Japan as tsubaki.
Swedish naturalist Carolus Linnaeus praised their 'flesh succulent and tender; fat and skin useful.' The animals' long-sought breeding grounds in the Bering Sea were found by Russian navigator Gerasim Pribilof in 1786.
It was in a glasshouse, the glasshouse of a rich man named George Clifford, that Carolus Linnaeus, Adam-like, invented modern plant nomenclature.
Carl von Linne (1707-1778), born in Sweden, is better known by the Latinized version of his name, Carolus Linnaeus. Always interested in plants, he traveled 4,600 miles through northern Scandinavia, where he discovered a hundred new species of plants.
One well known instance of this practice is the system of binomial nomenclature identifying each animal and plant by genus and species (e.g., Canis lupus), which was established by the Swedish botanist Carl von Linne (Carolus Linnaeus) in the eighteenth century.
Two of his noted pieces include a large bronze monument of Albert Einstein, and his most complex piece, a large kneeling figure of Carolus Linnaeus, originator of the science of botany.