marsupial

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Related to Carnivorous marsupial: dasyurid

mar·su·pi·al

(mar-sū'pē-ăl),
1. A member of the order Marsupalia, which includes such mammals as kangaroos, wombats, bandicoots, and opossums, the female of which has an abdominal pouch for carrying the young.
2. Of or pertaining to marsupials.
[L. marsupium, a pouch]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

marsupial

(mär-so͞o′pē-əl)
n.
Any of various nonplacental mammals of the infraclass Metatheria, including kangaroos, opossums, bandicoots, and wombats, found principally in Australia and the Americas, and typically bearing young that suckle and develop after birth in the mother's pouch. These species were formerly placed in the order Marsupialia.
adj.
1. Of or belonging to the infraclass Metatheria.
2. Relating to or having a marsupium.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

marsupial

adjective Referring to a pouch.

noun Any pouched mammal of the order Marsupialia.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

marsupial

any member of the subclass Marsupialia (also called Didelphia or Metatheria) containing mammals characterized by the absence of a placenta and the presence of a pouch to which the young, born in an undeveloped state, migrate during early development. The pouch contains the mammary glands, which vary in number between species, and the young complete their development here. The group was at one time widespread, but now is restricted to Australasia and South America. In Australasia, marsupials, free from competition from EUTHERIAN (placental) mammals, have radiated to occupy most niches elsewhere occupied by placental forms.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The book describes the characteristics and diversity of carnivorous marsupials and has a guide to the 136 living species accompanied by excellent photos, some never-before-seen, particularly those of American marsupials.
An analysis of some predatory behaviour patterns in four species of carnivorous marsupials (Dasyuridae), with comparative notes on the eutherian cat Felis catus.
The grotesque facial tumours were first spotted in the devil population around a decade ago in the north east of Australia's island state of Tasmania - the only place in the world where the carnivorous marsupials exist outside zoos.
The world's largest carnivorous marsupials are the size of a Jack Russell terrier, with jaws like a pit bull, and can crunch kangaroo bones like they were crisps.
In the middens, the scientists found material derived from the prey of such predators as small dasyurids (carnivorous marsupials), dingoes, birds of prey, bats, lizards, snakes and feral cats and foxes.
The smaller dasyurids (Australian carnivorous marsupials) have a precarious start in life because the female only has six teats, but gives birth to 12 or more young.
271-284, in: Predators with pouches: The biology of carnivorous marsupials (M Jones, C Dickman, and M Archers, eds.).
229-237, in: Predators with pouches: the biology of carnivorous marsupials (M Jones, C Dickman, and
63-81, en: Predators with Pouches: the biology of carnivorous Marsupials (M Jones, R Dickman y M Archer eds.).