gauss

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Gauss

(gows),
Johann K.F., German physicist, 1777-1855. See: gauss, gaussian curve, gaussian distribution.

Gauss

(gows),
Karl J., German gynecologist, 1875-1957. See: Gauss sign.

gauss (G),

(gows),
A unit of magnetic field intensity, equal to 10-4 T.
[J.K.F. Gauss]

gauss

A cgs (non-SI) unit of magnetic field strength, which approximates that of the earth's magnetic field at its surface (circa 0.5–1G). One gauss (G) = 1 line of flux/cm2. As larger magnetic fields are common in MRIs, gauss has been largely replaced by tesla (T), where 1 T = 10,000 G.

gauss

(G) (gows)
A unit of magnetic field intensity, equal to 10-4 tesla.
[J.K.F. Gauss]

Gauss,

Johann K.F., German physicist, 1777-1855.
gauss - a unit of magnetic field intensity.
gaussian curve - a specific bell-shaped frequency distribution. Synonym(s): gaussian distribution; normal distribution
gaussian distribution - Synonym(s): gaussian curve
References in periodicals archive ?
Carl Friedrich Gauss: A Biography, Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1970.
Waldo Carl Friedrich Gauss: Titan of Science New York: Exposition Press, 1955.
One of the biggest German films this year, the ambitious 11 million [euro] ($14 million) 3D production revolves around 19th century scientists Carl Friedrich Gauss and Alexander von Humboldt, both of whom measured the world in very different ways.
The mathematician Carl Friedrich Gauss did a great deal of work on average and created a method to show the range of what is normally expected.
In his article 329 Disquisitiones Arithmeticae (1801), the German mathematician Carl Friedrich Gauss (1777-1855) wrote: The problem of distinguishing prime numbers from composite numbers and of resolving the latter into their prime factors is known to be one of the most important and useful in arithmetic.
In the 19th century, Carl Friedrich Gauss weighed in with a partial proof of Kepler's conjecture.
(Only the "corresponding" members are invited from the world outside Gottingen.) The historical roster of the academy, which still meets every two weeks, amounts to a roll call of some of Germany's most famous scholars in every field (e.g., Carl Friedrich Gauss and Julius Wellhausen).
He also gave a new algorithm for calendrical computations that was superior to an earlier formula developed by the famous German mathematician Carl Friedrich Gauss. First published in Warsaw in 1852, the book was revised twice (the third edition appearing in 1888) and was translated into English and German.