cardiopulmonary bypass

(redirected from Cardiac pump)
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Related to Cardiac pump: cardiopulmonary bypass, Cardiopulmonary bypass machine

bypass

 [bi´pas″]
an auxiliary flow; a shunt; a surgically created pathway circumventing the normal anatomical pathway, such as in an artery or the intestine.
Bypass. Single artery bypass of an occluded right coronary artery. From Dorland's, 2000.
aortocoronary bypass coronary artery bypass.
aortofemoral bypass insertion of a vascular prosthesis from the aorta to the femoral artery to bypass atherosclerotic occlusions in the aorta and the iliac artery.
aortoiliac bypass insertion of a vascular prosthesis from the abdominal aorta to the femoral artery to bypass intervening atherosclerotic segments.
axillofemoral bypass insertion of a vascular prosthesis or section of saphenous vein from the axillary artery to the ipsilateral femoral artery to relieve lower limb ischemia in patients in whom normal anatomic placement of a graft is contraindicated, as by abdominal infection or aortic aneurysm.
axillopopliteal bypass insertion of a vascular prosthesis from the axillary artery to the popliteal artery to relieve lower limb ischemia in patients in whom the femoral artery is unsuitable for axillofemoral bypass.
cardiopulmonary bypass diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance to the right atrium directly to the aorta, usually via a pump oxygenator, avoiding both the heart and the lungs; a form of extracorporeal circulation used in heart surgery.
coronary bypass (coronary artery bypass) a section of saphenous vein or other conduit grafted between the aorta and a coronary artery distal to an obstructive lesion in the latter; called also aortocoronary bypass.
extra-anatomic bypass an arterial bypass that does not follow the normal anatomic pathway, such as an axillofemoral bypass.
extracranial/intracranial bypass anastomosis of the superficial temporal artery to the middle cerebral artery to preserve function or prevent stroke or death in patients with stenosis of the internal carotid or middle cerebral artery.
femorofemoral bypass insertion of a vascular prosthesis between the femoral arteries to bypass an occluded or injured iliac artery.
femoropopliteal bypass insertion of a vascular prosthesis from the femoral to the popliteal artery to bypass occluded segments.
gastric bypass see gastric bypass.
hepatorenal bypass insertion of a vascular prosthesis between the common hepatic artery and the renal artery, serving as a passage around an occluded segment of renal artery.
intestinal bypass (jejunoileal bypass) see intestinal bypass.
left heart bypass diversion of the flow of blood from the pulmonary veins directly to the aorta, avoiding the left atrium and the left ventricle.
partial bypass the deviation of only a portion of the blood flowing through an artery.
partial ileal bypass anastomosis of the proximal end of the transected ileum to the cecum, the bypass of the portion of the small intestine resulting in decreased intestinal absorption of and increased fecal excretion of cholesterol; sometimes used in treatment of hyperlipidemia.
right heart bypass diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance of the right atrium directly to the pulmonary arteries, avoiding the right atrium and right ventricles.

car·di·o·pul·mo·nar·y by·pass

diversion of the blood flow returning to the heart through a pump oxygenator (heart-lung machine) and then returning it to the arterial side of the circulation; used in operations upon the heart to maintain extracorporeal circulation.

cardiopulmonary bypass

n.
A procedure to circulate and oxygenate the blood while surgery is performed on the heart. It involves the diversion of blood from the heart and lungs through a heart-lung machine and the return of oxygenated blood to the aorta.

cardiopulmonary bypass

a procedure used in heart surgery in which the blood is diverted from the right atrium or vena cava by means of a pump oxygenator and returned directly to the aorta.

cardiopulmonary bypass

Cardiovascular surgery A procedure in which the flow of blood to the heart is diverted to a heart-lung machine–a pump-oxygenator before returning it to the arterial circulation, used in
modern open heart surgery; aortic cannulation is used for arterial inflow; a single right atrial cannula is used for venous return to the pump; after the ascending aorta is clamped, cold potassium cardioplegia solution is infused into the aortic root, which arrests and protects the heart during the heart surgery

car·di·o·pul·mo·nar·y by·pass

(kahr'dē-ō-pul'mŏ-nār-ē bī'pas)
Diversion of the blood flow returning to the heart through a pump oxygenator (heart-lung machine) and then returning it to the arterial side of the circulation; used in operations on the heart to maintain extracorporeal circulation.

cardiopulmonary bypass

The avoidance of circulation of blood through the heart and lungs by the use of an artificial pumping device (HEART-LUNG MACHINE), so as to allow unimpeded open heart surgery or heart transplantation.

Cardiopulmonary bypass

Mechanically circulating the blood with a heart/lung machine that bypasses the heart and lungs.
Mentioned in: Heart Transplantation

bypass

an auxiliary flow; a shunt; a surgically created pathway circumventing the normal anatomical pathway, as an intestinal bypass.

cardiopulmonary bypass
diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance to the right atrium directly to the aorta, usually via a pump oxygenator, avoiding both the heart and the lungs; a form of extracorporeal circulation used mainly in experimental animals in the investigation of cardiac prosthetic devices. Called also CPB.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices deliver pacing impulses to the heart muscle to resynchronize the contractions of the ventricles and thus increase cardiac pump efficiency.
Over the last several years, our scientists have pioneered an elegant and distinctive approach to the treatment of congestive heart failure by focusing multi-disciplinary research activities on the molecular actors that directly contribute to contractile force and cardiac pump function.
Al-Akhras periodically supervises free medical and charitable donations from the United States to Syrian patients, in addition to medical equipment, devices, cardiac pumps, and hospital beds.
Other potential uses include hip and femoral bone replacements, bone screws and pins, components for implanted cardiac pumps, and dental posts and caps.