cardiac muscle

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Related to Cardiac myocyte: cardiac muscle, Cardiomyocytes

car·di·ac mus·cle

the involuntary muscle comprising the myocardium and walls of the pulmonary veins and superior vena cava, consisting of anastomosing transversely striated muscle fibers formed of cells united at intercalated discs; the one or two nuclei of each cell are centrally located and the longitudinally arranged myofibrils have considerable sarcoplasm around them; connective tissue is limited to reticular and fine collagenous fibers; contraction is rhythmic and intrinsically stimulated.
Synonym(s): muscle of heart

cardiac muscle

n.
The specialized striated muscle tissue of the heart; the myocardium.

car·di·ac mus·cle

(kahr'dē-ak mŭs'ĕl)
The muscle forming the myocardium, consisting of anastomosing transversely striated muscle fibers formed of cells united at intercalated discs.
Synonym(s): muscle of heart.
Cardiac muscleclick for a larger image
Fig. 91 Cardiac muscle . The intercalated discs enable the rapid transmission of excitatory waves across the tissue.

cardiac muscle

a type of vertebrate muscle found only in the HEART, which appears to be halfway between INVOLUNTARY MUSCLE and STRIATED MUSCLE in that its fibres are striated, but contain a single nucleus (see Fig. 91 ). The action of cardiac fibres is to produce strong and rhythmic contractions from within, even when removed from the body (see MYOGENIC CONTRACTION). Unlike striated muscle, cardiac muscle does not become fatigued even though it is repeatedly stimulated. The heartbeat is controlled by the AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cardiac myocyte size in the non-infarcted left ventricular myocardium was also increased following myocardial infarction.
Cardioplegia arrest induces apoptotic signal cascades in endothelial cells and cardiac myocytes in the human myocardium [11, 12].
However, these assays are based on cardiomyoblast cell lines or primary neonatal and adult cardiac myocytes [1] and thus have major limitations, including a low proliferation capacity, uncontrolled stress during cell isolation, low throughput, and poor predictability of the assays towards in vivo efficacy [2].
2011) showing that R(+) pulegone impairs the cardiac contractility by reducing [Ca.sup.2+] and [K.sup.+] currents, so far there is no information about the effect of this drug on distinct [K.sup.+] channel subtypes expressed in cardiac myocytes. Additionally, it is not know the implications of those cellular effects on the in vivo cardiac electrophysiology profile.
Comparison of SERCA1 and SERCA2a expressed in COS-1 cells and cardiac myocytes. Am J Physiol 1999; 277: H2381-2391.
In the present study, we aimed to investigate the function of miR-24 in cardiac hypertrophy by establishing a transverse aortic constriction (TAC) rat model, and miR-24 overexpressing in neonatal rat cardiac myocytes (NRCMs).
It is caused by the metabolic imbalance involving elevated energy requirements and deficient oxygen supply to the cardiac myocytes, ultimately leading to myocardial necrosis [2].
Ikejima, "Silibinin protects rat cardiac myocyte from isoproterenol-induced DNA damage independent on regulation of cell cycle," Biological and Pharmaceutical Bulletin, vol.
Caption: Figure 1: Schematic diagram showing the summary of some of the proposed mechanisms involved in the alterations in [Ca.sup.2+] signaling in cardiac myocyte from the GK diabetic heart.
Hypoxia and acidosis activate cardiac myocyte death through the Bcl-2 family protein BNIP3.
Caption: FIGURE 6: H&E staining showing cardiac myocyte invasion (40x).