cardenolide

(redirected from Cardenolides)

car·den·o·lide

(kar-den'ō-līd),
A class of cardiac glycosides containing a five-membered lactone ring (for example, the Digitalis glycosides).

cardenolide

one of the two groups of naturally occurring cardiac glycosides; found in plants including Digitalis, Nerium, Thevetia, Cryptostegia, Euonymus, Gomphocarpus, Asclepias, Corchorus, Convallaria, Gerbera, Adonis, Acokanthera spp. Those from Digitalis spp. are used medicinally.
References in periodicals archive ?
leaf samples Test Result Alkaloids + Flavonoids - Cardenolides - Anthraquinones + Tannins + Coumarins - Indoles - Sugars + Higher alcohols - Saponins - (-): Absent, (+): Present Table 3: Serum enzyme levels across different experimental treatment groups Group Serum enzyme, I U/L (mean[+ or -]SD) AST ALT I (normal) 76.
planchonii leaves was subjected to various qualitative and quantitative phytochemical screenings to detect the presence of the following bioactive principles: alkaloids, steroids, anthraquinones, cardenolides, phenols, flavonoids, tannins, triterpenes, glycoside, and saponins.
A brown ring at the interface indicated the presence of a deoxysugar characteristic of cardenolides.
Fluorescence detection of cardenolides in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography after post-column derivatization.
A phytochemical analysis of carica papayaleaves discovered the presence of papain chymopapin alkaloids flavonols flavonoids saponins tannis cardiac glycoside anthraquinones reducing sugar steroids phenols and cardenolides.
To further explain, larvae require cardenolides from said plants in order to survive and grow, a phenomenon discovered by Swiss Nobel laureate Tadeus Reichstein.
Plants belonging to this genus are rich in esteried polyhydroxypregnane glycosides, some of which showed antitumor activity and others were postulated as precursors of cardenolides [4,5].
Tarsal contact chemoreceptor response to glucosinolates and cardenolides mediating oviposition in Pieris rapae.
Cardenolides are a secondary chemical that milkweeds use as a defense compound; many plant and animal species use cardenolides in this manner, in particular, monarch butterfly larva sequester them from feeding on milkweed.
Molecules with similar structures include cardenolides, such as digoxin and digitoxin, which are known substrates of ABC transporters (de Lan noy and Silverman 1992; Cavet et al.