carbon

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carbon

 (C) [kahr´bon]
a chemical element, atomic number 6, atomic weight 12.011. (See Appendix 6.)
carbon 11 a radioactive isotope of carbon, atomic mass 11, having a half-life of 20.39 minutes; used as a tracer in positron emission tomography.
carbon 14 a radioactive isotope of carbon, atomic mass 14, having a half-life of 5730 years; used as a tracer in cancer and metabolic research.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

car·bon (C),

(kar'bŏn),
A nonmetallic tetravalent element, atomic no. 6, atomic wt. 12.011; the major bioelement. It has two natural isotopes, 12C and 13C (the former, set at 12.00000, being the standard for all molecular weights), and two artificial, radioactive isotopes of interest, 11C and 14C. The element occurs in three pure forms (diamond, graphite, and in the fullerines), in amorphous form (in charcoal, coke, and soot), and in the atmosphere as CO2. Its compounds are found in all living tissues, and the study of its vast number of compounds constitutes most of organic chemistry.
[L. carbo, coal]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

carbon

(kär′bən)
n.
1. Symbol C An abundant nonmetallic element that occurs in many inorganic and in all organic compounds, exists freely in amorphous, graphite, and diamond forms and as a constituent of coal, limestone, and petroleum, and is capable of chemical self-bonding to form an enormous number of chemically, biologically, and commercially important molecules. Other significant allotropes include fullerenes and nanotubes. Atomic number 6; atomic weight 12.011; sublimation point 3,825°C; triple point 4,489°C; specific gravity of amorphous carbon 1.8 to 2.1, of diamond 3.15 to 3.53, of graphite 1.9 to 2.3; valence 2, 3, 4. See Periodic Table.
2. A carbon-containing gas, notably carbon dioxide, or a collection of such gases, especially when considered as a contributor to the greenhouse effect: plans for capturing and sequestering carbon produced by power plants.
3.
a. A sheet of carbon paper.
b. A carbon copy.
4. Electricity
a. Either of two rods through which current flows to form an arc, as in lighting or welding.
b. A carbonaceous electrode in an electric cell.

car′bon·ous (-bə-nəs) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

carbon

Chemistry
A nonmetallic tetravalent element (atomic number, 6; atomic weight, 12.01), which is central to all forms of life, and a core constituent of organic molecules.
 
Materials science
Because of its chemical properties, carbon has potential for use with silicon as a low-activation structural material for fusion reactors, as silicon carbide.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

car·bon

(C) (kahr'bŏn)
A nonmetallic tetravalent element, atomic no. 6, atomic wt. 12.011; the major bioelement. It has two natural isotopes, 12C and 13C (the former, set at 12.00000, being the standard for all molecular weights), and two artificial, radioactive isotopes of interest, 11C and 14C. The element occurs in diamond, graphite, charcoal, coke, and soot, and in the atmosphere as CO2. Its compounds are found in all living tissues, and the study of its vast number of compounds constitutes most of organic chemistry.
[L. carbo, coal]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

carbon

The non-metallic element on which all organic chemistry is based and which is thus present in all organic matter. A carbon atom is capable of combining with up to four other atoms (tetravalent), including other carbon atoms; it is this property that allows so many compounds to be formed.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

carbon

the element which is the basis of organic structure. Carbon has a valency of four, each atom forming four covalent bonds in its compounds. Long chains may be formed which give rise to the complexity of many organic compounds.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

car·bon

(C) (kahr'bŏn)
Nonmetallic tetravalent element found in all living tissues; the study of its vast number of compounds constitutes most of organic chemistry.
[L. carbo, coal]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about carbon

Q. hi my name is ray i am from england and i am on oxygen i am a retainer of carbon monxide do you guys know whoa any place working with stem cell or natural medical emial rsantolla@aol.co.uk

A. i had a whole course on stem cell use in tissue engineering and from what i know this is an area that still in research and very little clinical use. the ability to create lungs from Mesenchimal Stem Cells is a far away dream right now. but here are some links to labs that research that area:
http://organizedwisdom.com/Stem_Cells_for_Emphysema

More discussions about carbon
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References in periodicals archive ?
Coal is considered a live carbon if it has not evolved its hydrocarbon gases.
Participants will also learn how higher gasoline prices are affecting SUV (and tire) sales in North America, and how the trend to smaller tires in Japan will impact carbon black use.
"We've shown how carbon in a very high-energy environment reacts with itself and goes on to form fullerenes," says Michael T.
Using a computer program, they constructed the buckygym by substituting seven-sided rings of carbon where fullernes typically have five-sided rings: Six-sided rings surround each seven-sided ring, and each six-sided ring is surrounded by alternating six- and seven-sided rings.
Though fullerenes resemble aromatic (ringed) carbon compounds in some aspects of their structure, chemists continue to uncover surprising differences in their properties.
About 96 percent of the carbon dioxide from fossil-fuel combustion enters the atmosphere in the Northern Hemisphere.
CDM provided an avenue for both parties to benefit from the technology transfer: the wind farm reduces Korea's carbon emissions and fossil fuel dependency, and the investors earn carbon credits.
Sun speculates that the electrons creating the effect in carbon dots are confined to the dots' surfaces rather than to their cores, so their color would depend upon surface chemistry.
Participants are said to receive it balanced view of where carbon black is heading and where new business opportunities are developing.
Terrestrial biomass is a huge short-term carbon reservoir (~2000 Gt C) that uses photosynthesis and plant respiration to exchange carbon with the atmosphere.