carbon

(redirected from Carbonless)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

carbon

 (C) [kahr´bon]
a chemical element, atomic number 6, atomic weight 12.011. (See Appendix 6.)
carbon 11 a radioactive isotope of carbon, atomic mass 11, having a half-life of 20.39 minutes; used as a tracer in positron emission tomography.
carbon 14 a radioactive isotope of carbon, atomic mass 14, having a half-life of 5730 years; used as a tracer in cancer and metabolic research.

car·bon (C),

(kar'bŏn),
A nonmetallic tetravalent element, atomic no. 6, atomic wt. 12.011; the major bioelement. It has two natural isotopes, 12C and 13C (the former, set at 12.00000, being the standard for all molecular weights), and two artificial, radioactive isotopes of interest, 11C and 14C. The element occurs in three pure forms (diamond, graphite, and in the fullerines), in amorphous form (in charcoal, coke, and soot), and in the atmosphere as CO2. Its compounds are found in all living tissues, and the study of its vast number of compounds constitutes most of organic chemistry.
[L. carbo, coal]

carbon

/car·bon/ (C) (kahr´bon) a chemical element, at. no. 6.
carbon dioxide  an odorless, colorless gas, CO2, resulting from oxidation of carbon, and formed in the tissues and eliminated by the lungs; used in some pump oxygenators to maintain blood carbon dioxide tension. In solid form it is carbon dioxide snow (see under snow ).
carbon monoxide  an odorless gas, CO, formed by burning carbon or organic fuels with a scanty supply of oxygen; inhalation causes central nervous system damage and asphyxiation by combining irreversibly with blood hemoglobin.
carbon tetrachloride  a clear, colorless, volatile liquid; inhalation of its vapors can depress central nervous system activity and cause degeneration of the liver and kidneys.

carbon

(kär′bən)
n.
1. Symbol C An abundant nonmetallic element that occurs in many inorganic and in all organic compounds, exists freely in amorphous, graphite, and diamond forms and as a constituent of coal, limestone, and petroleum, and is capable of chemical self-bonding to form an enormous number of chemically, biologically, and commercially important molecules. Other significant allotropes include fullerenes and nanotubes. Atomic number 6; atomic weight 12.011; sublimation point 3,825°C; triple point 4,489°C; specific gravity of amorphous carbon 1.8 to 2.1, of diamond 3.15 to 3.53, of graphite 1.9 to 2.3; valence 2, 3, 4. See Periodic Table.
2. A carbon-containing gas, notably carbon dioxide, or a collection of such gases, especially when considered as a contributor to the greenhouse effect: plans for capturing and sequestering carbon produced by power plants.
3.
a. A sheet of carbon paper.
b. A carbon copy.
4. Electricity
a. Either of two rods through which current flows to form an arc, as in lighting or welding.
b. A carbonaceous electrode in an electric cell.

car′bon·ous (-bə-nəs) adj.

carbon (C)

[kärbən]
Etymology: L, carbo, coal
a nonmetallic, almost always tetravalent element. Its atomic number is 6; its atomic mass is 12.011. Carbon occurs in pure form in diamonds, graphite, and fullerenes and is a component of all living tissue. The study of organic chemistry focuses on the vast number of carbon compounds. Carbon occurs in impure form in charcoal, coke, and soot, and in the atmosphere as carbon dioxide. Carbon is essential to the chemical mechanisms of the body, participating in many metabolic processes and acting as a component of carbohydrates, amino acids, triglycerides, deoxyribonucleic and ribonucleic acids, and many other compounds. See also carbon-11, carbon-14.

carbon

Chemistry
A nonmetallic tetravalent element (atomic number, 6; atomic weight, 12.01), which is central to all forms of life, and a core constituent of organic molecules.
 
Materials science
Because of its chemical properties, carbon has potential for use with silicon as a low-activation structural material for fusion reactors, as silicon carbide.

car·bon

(C) (kahr'bŏn)
A nonmetallic tetravalent element, atomic no. 6, atomic wt. 12.011; the major bioelement. It has two natural isotopes, 12C and 13C (the former, set at 12.00000, being the standard for all molecular weights), and two artificial, radioactive isotopes of interest, 11C and 14C. The element occurs in diamond, graphite, charcoal, coke, and soot, and in the atmosphere as CO2. Its compounds are found in all living tissues, and the study of its vast number of compounds constitutes most of organic chemistry.
[L. carbo, coal]

carbon

The non-metallic element on which all organic chemistry is based and which is thus present in all organic matter. A carbon atom is capable of combining with up to four other atoms (tetravalent), including other carbon atoms; it is this property that allows so many compounds to be formed.

carbon

the element which is the basis of organic structure. Carbon has a valency of four, each atom forming four covalent bonds in its compounds. Long chains may be formed which give rise to the complexity of many organic compounds.

carbon

a non-metallic element (C) forming compounds that occur in all living tissues; carbon, liberated by metabolic reactions, unites with oxygen (during tissue respiration) forming carbon dioxide (CO2)

car·bon

(C) (kahr'bŏn)
Nonmetallic tetravalent element found in all living tissues; the study of its vast number of compounds constitutes most of organic chemistry.
[L. carbo, coal]

carbon,

n a nonmetallic tetravalent element that occurs in pure form in diamonds and graphite. It occurs as a component of all living tissue. Most of the study of organic chemistry focuses on the vast number of carbon compounds.
carbon coated,
adj a vitreous carbon coating applied to either an endosteal or blade implant to improve tissue compatability.
carbon dioxide,
n a colorless, odorless gas produced by the complete oxidation of carbon. It is a product of cell respiration and is carried by the blood to the lungs and exhaled. The acid-base balance of body fluids and tissues is affected by the level of it and its carbonate compounds.
carbon monoxide,
n a colorless, odorless, poisonous gas produced by the combustion of carbon or organic fuels in a limited oxygen supply. It combines irreversibly with hemoglobin, preventing the formation of oxyhemoglobin and reducing the oxygen supply to the tissues.

carbon

a chemical element, atomic number 6,atomic weight 12.011, symbol C. See Table 6.

asymmetric carbon atom
one bonded to four different atoms. See also isomer.
carbon fiber
made by the pyrolization of polymer fibers at very high temperatures and used in various forms as soft tissue implants, particularly in tendon and ligament repair.
carbon fixation
see dark reaction.

Patient discussion about carbon

Q. hi my name is ray i am from england and i am on oxygen i am a retainer of carbon monxide do you guys know whoa any place working with stem cell or natural medical emial rsantolla@aol.co.uk

A. i had a whole course on stem cell use in tissue engineering and from what i know this is an area that still in research and very little clinical use. the ability to create lungs from Mesenchimal Stem Cells is a far away dream right now. but here are some links to labs that research that area:
http://organizedwisdom.com/Stem_Cells_for_Emphysema

More discussions about carbon
References in periodicals archive ?
The Company produces thermal, carbonless, security, inkjet, digital specialty and colored papers.
What are some of the common sources of carbonless copy paper health risks?
Like the Company's thermal papers segment, the carbonless segment achieved improved manufacturing performance in second quarter 2015.
Common office tasks such as writing or carbonless copy pa per, photocopying and using a computer recently have come under scrutiny as work-site health risks by the U.
Appleton produces carbonless, thermal, security and performance packaging products.
While Appleton retains its traditional carbonless paper business, it is aggressively developing new paper products and products outside the traditional paper industry.
com, the internet's premier source for Point of Sale supplies, paper products, and accessories, has assumed a leading role in an industry revolution that has seen thermal paper rolls replacing multi-part carbonless business forms in several industries through the sale of its thermal paper rolls.
Tenders are invited for Printed Carbonless Forms For City Of Mobile.
Lower prices and volume for thermal receipt paper offset benefits of growth from Encapsys and carbonless segments
While Appleton retains its traditional carbonless paper business, it is developing new paper products and products outside the traditional paper industry.
It is involved in the conversion/processing and sales of a wide variety of paper products including; printing and writing paper, packaging and wrapping papers, carbonless papers, household products, containerboard and boxboard.
Contract notice: Supply of carbonless sets mandates for sf 34, sf 37 and sf 38 for the needs of the group la poste.