Carboniferous period


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Related to Carboniferous period: Permian period

Carboniferous period

a geological period that began about 370 million years ago and ended 280 million years ago. It is often divided at about 325 million BP into Lower and Upper Carboniferous; the coal measures from which the period derives its name occurred mainly in the latter period. Club mosses, horsetails and ferns were the dominant plants during the period, and amphibians the commonest vertebrates, though this was also the time of the emergence of the reptiles. Britain crossed the equator.
References in periodicals archive ?
The erosional events that delivered the clasts of the Del Raton and El Planchon formations were probably related to mountain range uplift episodes during the early (~348 Ma) Carboniferous period.
The national park's gritstones and shales were laid down in the middle Carboniferous Period (around 326-316 million years ago) when the northern part of the Peak District was covered by a huge river delta flowing down from what is now the Scottish Highlands and Northern England.
The spindly animals with feathery arms--called crinoids, but better known today by the plant-like name sea lily--appear to have been buried alive in storms during the Carboniferous Period, when North America was covered with vast inland seas.
Cockroach-type fossils have been found dating back to the Carboniferous period - about 350-290million years ago.
There was one other time, however,when theWelsh landscape was green and densely vegetated - about 300 million years ago, during the Carboniferous period.
During the Carboniferous Period, when Scotland lay on the Equator and experienced a tropical climate (360-285 million years ago) warm seawater flooded across the central Scotland valley in a vast tropical lagoon named Lake Cadell [5].
This event occurred during the Carboniferous Period.
Carboniferous Period swamp forests 320 million years ago helped to create today's Warwickshire coalfield and cross sections illustrate how the rocks were bent into a great trough.
The creature lived in the Upper Carboniferous period, when many of the coal seams in Britain were formed.
The droplets, or blebs, date to the Carboniferous period, when swampy forests of ferns and giant lycopod trees dominated the Earth.
Carbon sequestration by green plants has been with us since the carboniferous period some 345 million years ago, not exactly a new phenomenon.
Geologist and fossil tour guide, Tony Morgan, with one of the Museum's ammonites Pictures: PAUL HEAPS/ ph230209fossils-1; This beautiful ammonite is a feature of one of the polished slabs in Liverpool's Metquarter shopping centre; Tony, left, reveals a stigmaria tap root, right, from the Carboniferous period 350m years ago, on the paving stones outside the World Museum; A 244myear- old coral fossil, on the bollards by the Steble Fountain