carbon dioxide

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carbon dioxide

 
an odorless, colorless gas, CO2, resulting from oxidation of carbon, formed in the tissues and eliminated by the lungs; used in some pump oxygenators to maintain the carbon dioxide tension in the blood. It is also used in solid form; see carbon dioxide snow and carbon dioxide slush.
carbon dioxide combining power the ability of blood plasma to combine with carbon dioxide; indicative of the alkali reserve and a measure of the acid-base balance of the blood.
carbon dioxide content the amount of carbonic acid and bicarbonate in the blood; reported in millimoles per liter.
carbon dioxide–oxygen therapy administration of a mixture of carbon dioxide and oxygen (commonly 5 per cent CO2 and 95 per cent O2 or 10 per cent CO2 and 90 per cent O2); used for improvement of cerebral blood flow, stimulation of deep breathing, or treatment of singultation (hiccupping). Carbon dioxide acts by stimulating the respiratory center; it also increases heart rate and blood pressure. Therapy is given for 6 minutes or less with a 5 per cent mixture and 2 minutes or less with a 10 per cent mixture. Potential adverse effects include headache, dizziness, dyspnea, nausea, tachycardia and high blood pressure, blurred vision, mental depression, coma, and convulsions.
carbon dioxide slush solid carbon dioxide combined with a solvent such as acetone, and sometimes also alcohol; used as an escharotic to treat skin lesions such as warts and moles and as a peeling agent in chemabrasion.
carbon dioxide snow the solid formed by rapid evaporation of liquid carbon dioxide, giving a temperature of about −79°C (−110°F). It has been used in cryotherapy to freeze the skin, thus producing local anesthesia and arrest of blood flow. See also carbon dioxide slush.

car·bon di·ox·ide (CO2),

the product of the combustion of carbon with an excess of oxygen; in concentrations not less than 99.0% by volume of CO2.

carbon dioxide

n.
A colorless, odorless, incombustible gas, CO2, that is formed during respiration, combustion, and organic decomposition, is an essential component in photosynthesis, and is used in food refrigeration, carbonated beverages, inert atmospheres, fire extinguishers, and aerosols. Also called carbonic acid gas.

carbon dioxide

CO2 Physiology A metabolic byproduct of carbohydrate metabolism; it accumulates in tissues, is released to the blood in veins, and is eliminated via the lungs

car·bon di·ox·ide

(CO2) (kahr'bŏn dī-oks'īd)
The product of the combustion of carbon with an excess of air; in concentrations not less than 99.0% by volume of CO2, used as a respiratory stimulant.

carbon dioxide

A compound in which an atom of carbon is linked to two atoms of oxygen (CO2 ). Carbon dioxide is a colourless, odourless gas and is one of the chief waste products of tissue metabolism.

carbon dioxide

a colourless, odourless gas, heavier than air, produced in respiration of organisms, and utilized to form sugars in PHOTOSYNTHESIS. Formula: CO2 .

Carbon dioxide

A heavy, colorless gas that dissolves in water.
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hypercapnia

The presence of a raised carbon dioxide content or tension in a milieu (e.g. blood, tears). Contact lens wear tends to give rise to this condition, especially lenses of low gas transmissibility. See acidosis.

car·bon di·ox·ide

(CO2) (kahr'bŏn dī-oks'īd)
Product of the combustion of carbon with an excess of oxygen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Carbondioxide may be used for colonoscopic insufflation and offers the advantages of rapid absorption and alleviation of bowel distension when compared to atmospheric, nitrogen-rich air.
Plants on N-5 exhibited inconsistency in internal carbondioxide concentration.
The abdomen was insufflated with carbondioxide gas to a pressure of 15 mmHg.
From specific procedures thermo mineral water "SERBIAN SELTERS" which due to Quentin's classification is in the group of alcal muriotic carbondioxide hyperterms, is used.
He added, "We have the key players like, University of Toronto, Colorado School of Mines, Arizona State University, University of Oxford, University of California, Irvine, National University of Singapore, McGill, Massachusetts Institute of Technology among others which are doing their own bit, focusing on different aspects of the task like transportation and different capture techniques." Some of the projects related to carbon capture and undertaken under the NPRP include capture of carbondioxide (CO2) from natural and effluent gas streams and its conversion, theoretical and experimental study of asphaltene deposition during CO2 injection in Qatar's oil reservoirs, at Qatar University and Texas A&M, respectively.
More than 1 million vehicles are registered in Dubai and the carbondioxide emission from the transportation sector contributed to 47 percent of the air pollutants in the emirate in 2010.
An experimental investigation of transcritical carbondioxide systems for residential air-conditioning.
Digital and eminently adaptable, smart grids are bidirectional and capable of meeting growing user demand to become proactive consumersthat manage and produce energy more efficiently, as well as reduce carbondioxide emissions.
Increased usage of natural gas in the energy mix will be required in order to meet growing energy demand without creating more carbondioxide emissions and other pollutants.
[24.] Ueno H, Takana M and S MachmUdah Supercritical carbondioxide extraction of valuable compounds from Citrus junos seed.
The breath-by-breath samples were analyzed for oxygen consumption (V[O.sub.2], L x [min.sup.-1]), carbondioxide production (VC[O.sub.2] L x [min.sup.-1]), pulmonary ventilation (VE, L x [min.sup.-1]), end-tidal volume P[O.sub.2] (PET[O.sub.2]%) and PC[O.sub.2] (PETCO2%).