organophosphorus

(redirected from Carbon-phosphorus bond)
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organophosphorus

 [or″gah-no-fos´fah-rus]
a compound containing phosphorus bound to an organic molecule. Some are used as insecticides and others are nerve gases; they are highly toxic acetylcholinesterase inhibitors.
organophosphorus compound poisoning poisoning by excessive exposure to an organophosphorus compound; there are usually neurologic symptoms such as axonopathy and paralysis, and it often ends fatally.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
"We're looking at all kinds of antibiotics that have this carbon-phosphorus bond. So we found genes in a microbe that we thought would make an antibiotic.
To explain this "methane paradox," Karl and DeLong noted that many aerobic marine microbes host an enzyme that can cleave the carbon-phosphorus bond. If that bond were embedded in a molecule with a single carbon atom, methylphosphonic acid, one of the byproducts of this cleavage would be methane.
maritimus dies, other marine microbes break the carbon-phosphorus bond of the methylphosphonate to gobble up the phosphorus, an element that is rare in the oceans but essential to life.