carbon disulfide

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car·bon di·sul·fide (CS2),

an extremely flammable (flashpoint -30°C), colorless, toxic liquid with a characteristic ethereal odor (fetid when impure); it is a parasiticide.
Synonym(s): carbon bisulfide

carbon disulfide

A highly flammable volatile liquid, absorbable through the skin, lungs and GI mucosa. It is a common building block in organic chemistry. It is used as a non-polar solvent to produce viscose rayon, cellophane, and carbon tetrachloride, as well as for fumigating grain, chemical analysis, degreasing, dry cleaning and oil extraction.
 
Toxicology
Neurotoxic, dermotoxic; it may retard growth and sensory development. It is teratogenic in rats; reproductive risk is uncertain, but likely.

carbon disulfide

(dī-sŭl′fīd)
A colorless liquid, CS2, that is toxic when it touches the skin or is inhaled or consumed. It may cause an alcohol-like intoxication, burns, stupor, coma, or death. It is used principally in the manufacture of products such as cellophane or rayon and sometimes causes occupational health-related illnesses in workers who produce these substances.

carbon disulfide

an inflammable, volatile liquid used for treatment of bot fly larvae in the stomach of horses. Administered by stomach tube. Mixed with air it is dangerously explosive. Excess doses cause excitement, weakness and collapse.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, Wolverhampton council has stressed there is no health risks to residents and that produce grown in gardens is safe to eat, as carbon disulphide does not mix with water and sinks deep underground.
Dr Adrian Phillips, director of public health, Wolverhampton city Primary Care Trust said: "There is no evidence to suggest that the health of residents has been affected by the presence of carbon disulphide on the site.
Akzo Nobel had already discovered carbon disulphide on a car park adjoining Threadneedle Street, which was formerly used as a chemical storage area.
Akzo Nobel workmen have dug bore holes in 17 houses in the road with carbon disulphide traces found at number 22.
Chemical company Akzo Nobel found evidence of carbon disulphide when digging bore holes in 17 houses on the street, as part of a routine environmental survey.
Three homes in Threadneedle Street, Foleshill, will "probably" be bulldozed after high concentrations of carbon disulphide were found in one back garden in the road.
His home joins onto number 22, the house where "elevated concentrations" of carbon disulphide were found in the back garden.
Workers are boring holes in 17 gardens in Threadneedle Street, Foleshill, in a search for carbon disulphide, which has been discovered under a neighbouring site.