carbon cycle

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car·bon di·ox·ide cy·cle

, carbon cycle
the circulation of carbon as CO2 from the expired air of animals and decaying organic matter to plant life where it is synthesized (through photosynthesis) to carbohydrate material, from which, as a result of catabolic processes in all life, it is again ultimately released to the atmosphere as CO2.

carbon cycle

n.
1. Physics See carbon-nitrogen-oxygen cycle.
2. Ecology The combined processes, including photosynthesis, decomposition, and respiration, by which carbon as a component of various compounds cycles between its major reservoirs—the atmosphere, oceans, and living organisms.

carbon cycle

A general term for the flux of CO2 from the point of fixation by photosynthesis to its release into the atmosphere by anthropogenic activities.

car·bon di·ox·ide cy·cle

, carbon cycle (kahr'bŏn dī-oks'īd sī'kĕl)
The circulation of carbon as CO2 from the expired air of animals and decaying organic matter to plant life where it is synthesized (through photosynthesis) to carbohydrate material, from which, as a result of catabolic processes in all life, it is again ultimately released to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide.

carbon cycle

The important biological cycle in which carbon in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is taken up by plants, incorporated, by photosynthesis, into carbohydrates which are eaten by animals, and the carbon then oxidised and finally returned to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide waste gas.
Carbon cycleclick for a larger image
Fig. 90 Carbon cycle . The main steps.

carbon cycle

the circulation of carbon by the metabolic processes of living organisms in an ECOSYSTEM so that it always returns to an arbitrary starting point.