carbapenem

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carbapenem

(kahr-bă-pen'em),
Member of a class of antibiotic drugs that works by inhibiting cell wall synthesis.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

carbapenem

(kär′bə-pĕn′əm)
n.
Any of several semisynthetic or synthetic beta-lactam antibiotics that are used chiefly to treat serious infections caused by bacteria that are resistant to other antibiotics.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

carbapenem

A class of antibiotics with a broad spectrum of action against gram-positive, gram-negative, and anaerobic germs. The carbapenems include imipenem and meropenem.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Scientists identified a small number of genes that can cause resistance to carbapenem antibiotics when expressed.
Inhibition mechanism of carbapenem antibiotics on acylpeptide hydrolase, a key enzyme in the interaction with valproic acid.
Zaviceftaspecifically addresses multi-drug resistant Gram-negative infections, including those resistant to carbapenem antibiotics.
The FDA has cleared for marketing the Xpert Carba-R Assay, an infection control aid that tests patient specimens to detect specific genetic markers associated with bacteria that are resistant to Carbapenem antibiotics.
In this study all the ESBL positive isolates were found to be resistant to ampicillin and cotrimoxazole and sensitive to imipenem and meropenem, which advocates the usage of carbapenem antibiotics as the therapeutic alternative to [beta]-lactam antibiotics as indicated in many previous studies.
Objective: The New Delhi metallo-b-lactamase-1 (NDM-1) enzyme is a plasmid-encoded enzyme that inactivates carbapenem antibiotics. This study aims to ascertain if the modified Hodge test (MHT) has a role in screening for NDM-1 in Enterobacteriaceae with reduced carbapenem susceptibility.
Resistance to the clinically significant carbapenem antibiotics by enzymatic hydrolysis has been described in Enterobacteriaceae worldwide, and recently the class D [beta]-lactamase, OXA-48 and its variants have been detected more frequently.
According to the report, resistance to the treatment of last resort for life- threatening infections caused by a common intestinal bacteria, Klebsiella pneumonia -- carbapenem antibiotics -- has spread to the entire world.
Key findings from the report included that resistance to the treatment of last resort for life-threatening infections caused by a common intestinal bacteria, Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenem antibiotics has spread to all regions of the world.
Prof Neil Woodford, of Public Health England, said: "KPC is one of a number of enzymes that can make a bacteria resistant to carbapenem antibiotics.
In some parts of the world, only the carbapenem antibiotics class remains effective, but now signs are emerging of resistance even to this last line of defence.
Carbapenem antibiotics should be treated as the last resort and reserved for severe infections.