carbachol

(redirected from Carbamylcholine)
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carbachol

 [kahr´bah-kol]
a cholinergic agonist that is not hydrolyzed by acetylcholinesterase or pseudocholinesterase; it is used as a miotic and to lower intraocular pressure in treatment of glaucoma and after cataract surgery.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

carbachol

A cholinergic agonist, which acts on muscarinic and nicotinic receptors. It is used in ophthalmology to manage glaucoma and in ophthalmic surgery.

Contraindications
Carbachol’s parasympathomimetic effect precludes its use in patients with asthma, bradycardia, hypotension, coronary artery disease, peptic ulcers and urinary incontinence.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

carbachol

A parasympathomimetic formed by substituting an acetyl with a carbamyl group on acetylcholine, which acts on muscarinic and nicotinic receptors
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

carbachol

A drug with ACETYL CHOLINE-like properties of stimulating the PARASYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM. It is used to stimulate PERISTALSIS in the intestine, to treat retention of urine and sometimes to treat GLAUCOMA.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

parasympathomimetic drug 

A drug with an action resembling that caused by stimulation of the parasympathetic nervous system. Example: a miotic of which there are two types: a direct-acting cholinergic, such as pilocarpine or carbachol; and the other, indirect-acting anticholinesterase, such as physostigmine, neostigmine, echothiophate iodide, demecarium bromide. Syn. cholinergic drug. See miotics.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann
References in periodicals archive ?
Carbamylcholine, a stable and well-characterized analogue of acetylcholine, was used as an agonist [28], for it elicits a fast activating current that rapidly desensitizes during the application.
Figure 6(b) shows that on neuronal slow rise-time receptors, [alpha]-RgIB is able to block the ion current by 40%, compared to cells stimulated with carbamylcholine (Figure 6(a)).
Based on the results obtained in experiment 1, this assay was conducted to evaluate exclusively the cholinergic agonists acetylcholine chloride, carbamylcholine chloride (Nacalai Tesque Inc.), and succinylcholine chloride (Wako), and serotonin creatinine sulfate on the metamorphosis of a cohort of larvae of three age groups, 19, 21, and 23 days old.
Consequently, a concentration-effect curve (CEC) was obtained after cumulatively pipetting several concentrations of carbamylcholine chloride (carbachol, CCh, 0.01-100 [micro]M) or KCl (10-100 mM).
Noradrenaline bitartrate (NA), atropine, N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), indomethacin, carbamylcholine chloride (carbachol), 1-H-[1,2,4]-oxadiazolo-[4,3a]-quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), nifedipine, tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA), were purchased from Sigma-Aldrich Co.
It has been reported that scorpion venom stimulates the release of amylase in the pancreas lobes of guinea pigs, in a similar way with how carbamylcholine is produced, and this effect is blocked specifically by atropine and tetrodotoxin.