capsaicin

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capsicum

 [kap´sĭ-kum]
a plant of the genus Capsicum, the hot peppers, or the dried fruit derived from certain of its species (cayenne or red pepper); it contains the active ingredient capsaicin and is used as a counterirritant and also in pepper spray.

cap·sa·i·cin

(kap-sā'i-sin),
Alkaloidal principle in the fruits of various species of Capsicum, with the same uses. It depletes substance P from sensory nerve endings; sometimes used for pain in postherpetic neuralgia.

capsaicin

(kăp-sā′ĭ-sĭn)
n.
A pungent alkaloid, C18H27NO3, derived from certain capsicums that is a strong irritant to skin and mucous membranes and is used in some topical pain relievers and in pepper sprays.
Alternative nutrition A nutraceutical or food component from hot pepper that may prevent or mitigate disease and which may block pain signals
Source Chilli peppers
Neurology Capsaicine A chemical from hot chilli peppers that may be used in managing painful dysesthaesias of herpes and diabestes
Management Casein, a lipophilic phosphoprotein, acts like a detergent and strips the capsaicin from the receptors in the oral cavity

capsaicin

Neurology Capsaicine A chemical from red hot chili peppers that may be used for painful dysesthesias of herpes and DM; topical capsaicin triggers release of the neuropeptide, substance P from type C nociceptive fibers, opens Ca2+ and Na+ channels causing the initial pain associated with 'hot' foods; substance P is not replenished, thus pain sensation is ↓ after the initial pain; capsaicin binding is relatively strong and attributed to its lipophilic side chain Management Casein, a lipophyilic phosphoprotein acts like a detergent and strips the capsaicin from the receptors in the oral cavity; topical capsaicin may ↓ the symptoms of painful diabetic neuropathy. See Blister beetle, Scoville unit, Spicy foods.

cap·si·cum

(kap'si-kŭm)
Dried herbal remedy (and spice) made from Capsicum frutescens and other Capsicum spp.; both internal and external medicinal uses have been described (e.g., analgesic, therapy for GU problems).
Synonym(s): capsaicin, cayenne, hot pepper, red pepper.
[L., fr. capsa, box, case]

capsaicin

A pain-killing drug for external application used in the treatment of post-shingles pain and other painful peripheral nerve disorders. Brand names are Axsain and Zacin.

Capsaicin

An alkaloid found in hot peppers that is used in an inhalation test to identify patients with MCS.

cap·sa·i·cin

(kap-sā'i-sin)
Alkaloid used for analgesia.
[Irreg. fr. capsicum, + -in]
References in periodicals archive ?
The spicy aftertaste that capsaicinoids produce is not its taste but rather a reaction to pain.
The fact that concentration of capsaicinoids remained constant after pickling could be attributed to the permeability of peppers cells membranes may change during heat processing resulting in release of capsaicinoids and spreading from pericarp throughout the pepper thus contributing to the capsaicinoid concentration remain unchanged.
Sepulveda, "Capsaicinoids content andproximate composition of Mexican chilipeppers (Capsicum spp.) cultivated in the State of Chihuahua," CYTA--Journal of Food, vol.
The application of high-concentration capsaicinoids was generally well-tolerated, with 6.9% of patients needing a treatment-related-discomfort medication to alleviate the side effects in comparison to the 15-44% often reported in clinical trials [6,16-19].
Natural capsaicinoids also caused a concentration-dependent intracellular calcium increase, with significantly lower [E.sub.max] than capsaicin (40.99 [+ or -] 6.14% capsaicinoids versus 176.6 [+ or -] 35.83% capsaicin, P < 0.001), and similar EC50 (4.36 x [10.sup.-6] M capsaicinoids versus 1.90 x [10.sup.-6] M capsaicin, P = 0.1601) and Hill coefficient (1.18 [+ or -] 0.45 capsaicinoids versus 1.59 [+ or -] 0.86 capsaicin, P = 0.674) (Figure 2).
The ghost chilli emerged from relative obscurity after the Chilli Pepper Institute, at New Mexico State University, grew dozens of plants, used liquid chromatography to assess the capsaicinoids, or heat, molecules and submitted its findings to Guinness World Records in 2006, which certified it as the world's hottest.
One of the weights has a built-in 12-gram spray of 10-percent Peppergard, one of Mace's hottest 1.4-percent capsaicinoids concentration sprays.
Utilizing a patented beadletting technology, OmniActive is able to deliver the scientifically validated health benefits of the active component of hot red peppers, capsaicinoids, while avoiding oral or gastric irritation.
ATHE substances that give chili peppers their intensity are capsaicin and several related chemicals, which are collectively called capsaicinoids.
Mace Pepper Gel is a patent pending formulation of maximum strength OC pepper (1.4 percent capsaicinoids.) The OC pepper is suspended in a sticky gel instead of a liquid.