capsaicin

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Related to Capsaicinoid: Oleoresin capsicum

capsicum

 [kap´sĭ-kum]
a plant of the genus Capsicum, the hot peppers, or the dried fruit derived from certain of its species (cayenne or red pepper); it contains the active ingredient capsaicin and is used as a counterirritant and also in pepper spray.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cap·sa·i·cin

(kap-sā'i-sin),
Alkaloidal principle in the fruits of various species of Capsicum, with the same uses. It depletes substance P from sensory nerve endings; sometimes used for pain in postherpetic neuralgia.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

capsaicin

(kăp-sā′ĭ-sĭn)
n.
A pungent alkaloid, C18H27NO3, derived from certain capsicums that is a strong irritant to skin and mucous membranes and is used in some topical pain relievers and in pepper sprays.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Alternative nutrition A nutraceutical or food component from hot pepper that may prevent or mitigate disease and which may block pain signals
Source Chilli peppers
Neurology Capsaicine A chemical from hot chilli peppers that may be used in managing painful dysesthaesias of herpes and diabestes
Management Casein, a lipophilic phosphoprotein, acts like a detergent and strips the capsaicin from the receptors in the oral cavity
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

capsaicin

Neurology Capsaicine A chemical from red hot chili peppers that may be used for painful dysesthesias of herpes and DM; topical capsaicin triggers release of the neuropeptide, substance P from type C nociceptive fibers, opens Ca2+ and Na+ channels causing the initial pain associated with 'hot' foods; substance P is not replenished, thus pain sensation is ↓ after the initial pain; capsaicin binding is relatively strong and attributed to its lipophilic side chain Management Casein, a lipophyilic phosphoprotein acts like a detergent and strips the capsaicin from the receptors in the oral cavity; topical capsaicin may ↓ the symptoms of painful diabetic neuropathy. See Blister beetle, Scoville unit, Spicy foods.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cap·si·cum

(kap'si-kŭm)
Dried herbal remedy (and spice) made from Capsicum frutescens and other Capsicum spp.; both internal and external medicinal uses have been described (e.g., analgesic, therapy for GU problems).
Synonym(s): capsaicin, cayenne, hot pepper, red pepper.
[L., fr. capsa, box, case]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

capsaicin

A pain-killing drug for external application used in the treatment of post-shingles pain and other painful peripheral nerve disorders. Brand names are Axsain and Zacin.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Capsaicin

An alkaloid found in hot peppers that is used in an inhalation test to identify patients with MCS.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

cap·sa·i·cin

(kap-sā'i-sin)
Alkaloid used for analgesia.
[Irreg. fr. capsicum, + -in]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The fleshy tomato stands in sharp contrast to the more agriculturally difficult chilli plant that contain capsaicinoids, molecules that give peppers their spiciness.
Miguel-Chaovez, "Capsaicinoids in Chile pepper landraces of Puebla, Mexico," Agrociencia, vol.
The aim of the present study was to explore the pharmacodynamics of TRPV1 agonists (capsaicin, natural capsaicinoids, and piperine) in a bioassay using human PC-3 cells prior to performing a clinical study.
(1) Capsaicinoid konsantrasyonu ise oleoresin capsicum icerisindeki aktif bilesenleri (yani, capsaicin, nordihydrocapsaicin ve dihydrocapsaicin) belirtir ve urunun yakiciligi ile dogru orantili bir parametredir.
Though the seed-attacker Fusarium fungus lurks throughout the chilies' wild range, Haak and his colleagues have found that Bolivian chilies in dry spots skimp on the protective capsaicinoids. In a dry-zone population, plants yielding mouth-scorching chilies were rarer than in a population in a somewhat wetter place.
Capsaicin and all other capsaicinoids are classified as crystalline alkaloids, compounds that contain a nitrogen base and are found in plants.
The seeds become pungent through contact with the placenta but do not contain capsaicinoids of their own.
Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of drying and pickling processes on phenol and capsaicinoid contents, and their free radical-scavenging activity in Anaheim (red) pepper, and Jalapeno pepper.
In 1912, a pharmacist named Scoville came up with a heat index for measuring the 'heat' in a chilli product, or scoring capsaicinoid content.
(12) However, quantitative capsaicinoid concentrations of capsicum oleoresin samples may not always relate to their Scoville Heat Units designations.