TRPV1

(redirected from Capsaicin receptor)

TRPV1

A gene on chromosome 17p13.2 that encodes a protein which is a receptor for capsaicin and the structurally related vanilloids, and is a non-selective cation channel structurally related to the TRP family of ion channels. The receptor is also activated by high temperatures, suggesting that it functions as a transducer of noxious chemical and painful thermal stimuli in vivo.
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Malmberg et al., "Impaired nociception and pain sensation in mice lacking the capsaicin receptor," Science, vol.
Julius, "The capsaicin receptor: a heat-activated ion channel in the pain pathway," Nature, vol.
Its mechanism of action could be related with the capsaicin receptor, the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), for its role in the transmission of pain (Carnevale & Rohacs, 2016).
Dense innervation of CGRP-ir and capsaicin receptor, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1- (TRPV1-) ir, subepithelial stromal nerve fibers was demonstrated in the rat cornea, though their colocalization with acetylcholine was not examined [27].
Vigna, "Endocannabinoids induce ileitis in rats via the capsaicin receptor (VR1)," The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, vol.
Lombardi et al., "Expression of capsaicin receptor immunoreactivity in human peripheral nervous system and in painful neuropathies," Journal of the Peripheral Nervous System, vol.
Giannini et al., "Impaired nociception and inflammatory pain sensation in mice lacking the prokineticin receptor PKR1: focus on interaction between PKR1 and the capsaicin receptor TRPV1 in pain behavior," Journal of Neuroscience, vol.
Among these polymodal TRP channels, the TRPV1 channel (transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 or capsaicin receptor) has important physiological functions, including the modulation of pain sensation and the physiological responses induced by physical exercise.
It works by targeting the capsaicin receptor (also known as TRPV1) to inactivate the nerve fibers transmitting pain signals to the brain a therapeutic effect that can last for months until the nerve fiber regenerates.
There is a receptor on the nerves called TRPV1 (transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V [vanilloid], member 1), whose previous name was the capsaicin receptor. TRPV1 is regarded as the central nerve receptor in initiating and maintaining pain-related behaviour in animals and pain experience in humans'.
In fact, TRPV1 is often called the capsaicin receptor. Constant activation of the receptor on a nerve cell results in death of the neuron, mimicking loss of TRPV1, which could explain why diets rich in capsaicin have been linked to a lower incidence of diabetes and metabolic problems in humans.
Vigna, "Endocannabinoids induce ileitis in rats via the capsaicin receptor (VR1)," Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, vol.