capital

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capital

[kap′itəl]
Etymology: L, caput, head
1 of the highest importance; involving danger to life.
2 of or pertaining to the head of the femur.

capital

An expenditure by an NHS institution on the acquisition of land, premises (including new and refurbished), equipment and vehicles etc. An expenditure is regarded as capital if it is in excess of £5,000.

capital

(căp′ĭ-tăl) [L. capitalis]
Pert. to the head.

capital

pertaining to the head.

capital femoral epiphysis
epiphysis of the head of the femur; its detachment represents a specific syndrome in pigs.
References in classic literature ?
But before she went to join her husband in the Belgic capital, Mrs.
The capital of Loggoum could then be seen in its entire extent, like an unrolled chart.
And by 1901 they had put in use more than a million telephones and were professing to have a capital of a hundred millions.
The lower strata of the middle class -- the small tradespeople, shopkeepers, retired tradesmen generally, the handicraftsmen and peasants -- all these sink gradually into the proletariat, partly because their diminutive capital does not suffice for the scale on which Modern Industry is carried on, and is swamped in the competition with the large capitalists, partly because their specialized skill is rendered worthless by the new methods of production.
Bennigsen opened the council with the question: "Are we to abandon Russia's ancient and sacred capital without a struggle, or are we to defend it?
Thus countenanced, however, he obtained, in 1809, a charter from the legislature of the State of New York, incorporating a company under the name of "The American Fur Company," with a capital of one million of dollars, with the privilege of increasing it to two millions.
Nevertheless, it is quite true; still, I agree with you in thinking that my present ignorance of the first city in Europe is a reproach to me in every way, and calls for immediate correction; but, in all probability, I should have performed so important, so necessary a duty, as that of making myself acquainted with the wonders and beauties of your justly celebrated capital, had I known any person who would have introduced me into the fashionable world, but unfortunately I possessed no acquaintance there, and, of necessity, was compelled to abandon the idea.