Capgras syndrome


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Cap·gras syn·drome

(kăh'grah),
the delusional belief that a person (or people) close to the schizophrenic patient has been substituted for by one or more impostors; may have an organic etiology.
The delusion that family, friends and others have been replaced by imposters. It typically follows the development of negative feelings toward the other person that the subject cannot accept and attributes, instead, to the imposter. The syndrome has been reported in paranoid schizophrenia and, even more frequently, in organic brain disease

Cap·gras syn·drome

(kah'grah sin'drōm)
The delusional belief that a person (or people) close to the schizophrenic patient has been substituted for by one or more impostors; may have an organic etiology.

Capgras,

Jean Marie Joseph, French psychiatrist, 1873-1950.
Capgras phenomenon - Synonym(s): Capgras syndrome
Capgras syndrome - the delusional belief that a person close to the schizophrenic patient has been replaced by an impostor. Synonym(s): Capgras phenomenon; illusion of doubles
References in periodicals archive ?
A few years later a Paris colleague proposed to rename the "illusion des sosies" into Capgras Syndrome.
One study found 83% paranoid delusions and 43% derealization and depersonalization in Capgras syndrome cases (7).
He visits the patient and decides he has Capgras syndrome, i.
Related to this is the CAPGRAS SYNDROME, in which the patient is convinced that people close to him--family, friends--are quite cleverly dressed and coached but not the real thing.
Chapter 8 presents an application of the cognitive neuropsychological model of facial recognition to psychiatric delusional misidentification disorders, such as Capgras syndrome, where the individual claims that one or more of their close relatives have been replaced by near-imposters.
Capgras Syndrome (CS) is one of several disorders loosely grouped under the rubric of delusional misidentification syndromes (Christodoulou, 1991).
Byatt portrays the borderline states of mental illness in the Frederica Potter Quartet; the depiction of Capgras Syndrome in Richard PowersAE Echo Maker; the impact of trauma on consciousness in Jess WalterAEs The Zero and Janice GallowayAEs The Trick is to Keep Breathing; the integration of self in Keri HulmeAEs the bone people; and representations of consciousness in the context of the contemporary, digital condition in The Breathing Wall by Kate Pullinger, Stefan Schemat, and babel, Samantha Gorman and Danny CannizaroAEs Pry, and Joshua FerrisAE Then We Came to the End.
He makes statements about his DNA being changed and reports that he has 2 wives and the wife in the room was not the real one, which suggests Capgras syndrome.
He awakens with Capgras syndrome, a delusional disorder that prevents him from identifying his older sister, Karin, his caretaker after his accident.
The ex-teacher was awarded pounds 130,000 damages after a judge heard how rare Capgras Syndrome changed him from an outgoing, affectionate husband into someone who doesn't believe his wife exists.
He suffers from a rare condition called Capgras Syndrome, where the victim thinks someone close to them has been replaced by an impostor.