Capgras' Delusion

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The delusion that family, friends and others have been replaced by imposters. It typically follows the development of negative feelings toward the other person that the subject cannot accept and attributes, instead, to the imposter. The syndrome has been reported in paranoid schizophrenia and, even more frequently, in organic brain disease
References in periodicals archive ?
Valdes et al., "Testing the connections within face processing circuitry in Capgras delusion with diffusion imaging tractography," NeuroImage: Clinical, vol.
Pandis and Poole N., "15 Capgras delusion: a meta-analysis of case reports in the english language," Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry, vol.
Whereas reports of seizures leading to Capgras delusions are rare, other forms of psychosis are more commonly comorbid with epilepsy.
Here, we describe a patient with evolving visual hallucinations and Capgras delusions for objects that developed secondary to new onset occipital lobe epilepsy.
Hellawell, "Sequential Cotard and Capgras delusions," British Journal of Clinical Psychology, vol.
Capgras syndrome, which is also called Capgras delusion, is seen primarily in a psychiatric context--most commonly in functional or organic psychotic illnesses (4)--and secondarily in neurologic cases.
Reduced autonomic responses to faces in Capgras delusion. Proc Biol Sci.
Delusional explanations may then replace memory for lost items (delusions of theft), or activities of the care-giver or others (delusions of jealousy and persecutory delusions); impaired abilities to recognize faces (prosopagnosia) may lead to the failure to recognize the patient's own reflection, with the delusional belief that he or she is seeing a stranger (the picture sign), or mis-recognition of the care-giver may give rise to the delusional idea that the care-giver has been replaced by an imposter (Capgras delusion).