canyon

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Related to Canyons: Submarine Canyons

canyon

Radiation safety
A popular term for a plutonium reprocessing plant—e.g., in Hanford, Washington, or the Savannah River Site (SRS), which is 440 m tall.

Sport medicine
See Canyoning.
References in classic literature ?
But before he reached the bottom of the canyon he again was forced to the realization that his great strength was waning, and when he dropped exhausted at the foot of the cliff and saw before him the opposite wall that must be scaled, he bared his fighting fangs and growled.
As he crossed the floor of the canyon he saw something lying close to the base of the side wall he was approaching-something that stood out in startling contrast to all the surroundings and yet seemed so much a part and parcel of the somber scene as to suggest an actor amid the settings of a well-appointed stage, and, as though to carry out the allegory, the pitiless rays of flaming Kudu topped the eastern cliff, picking out the thing lying at the foot of the western wall like a giant spotlight.
And then, with a parting glance at the ancient skeleton, he turned to the task of ascending the western wall of the canyon. Slowly and with many rests he dragged his weakening body upwards.
Ahead he scanned the rough landscape for sign of another canyon which he knew would spell inevitable doom.
Even if no canyon intervened, his chances of surmounting even low hills seemed remote should he have the fortune to reach their base; but with another canyon hope was dead.
Had this hole existed in the bed of a canyon a mile long, or several miles long, it would have been well known.
The motion of all things was a drifting in the heart of the canyon. Sunshine and butterflies drifted in and out among the trees.
His head was turned down the canyon. His sensitive, quivering nostrils scented the air.
Then he went down the canyon, following the line of shovel-holes he had made in filling the pans.
Then he smoked a pipe by the smouldering coals, listening to the night noises and watching the moonlight stream through the canyon. After that he unrolled his bed, took off his heavy shoes, and pulled the blankets up to his chin.
Missile after missile Bulan rained down upon the struggling, howling Dyaks, until, seized by panic, they turned and fled incontinently down into the depths of the canyon and back along the narrow trail they had come, and then superstitious fear completed the rout that the flying rocks had started, for one whispered to another that this was the terrible Bulan and that he had but lured them on into the hills that he might call forth all his demons and destroy them.
And with that, Carter Watson departed down the canyon, mounted his horse, and rode to town.