canon law

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canon law

A body of law and edicts that arise from and are adopted by an ecclesiastic authority, which guides how Christian organisations are governed.
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References in periodicals archive ?
When surveying the general position taken by Freiburg and other manualists on the ordination of deaconesses, it is clear they agree essentially with the canonists. This is not surprising, as the manuals served to popularize the teachings of the schools.
The division between conservative canonists and multiculturalists does not map neatly onto this dispute and Euben does not treat it as such.
Pennington begins his answer by noting that the canonists, unlike the Romanists, dealt with a living, vital legal system.
Besides the comments of the canonists, such an explicit assertion of her consent is found to my knowledge in only one other account: the allegorized version of the story in the preaching collection known as the Gesta Romanorum, where Lucretia is the fallen soul who "consents" to sin but then is moved to pierce itself with the "sword of penance."(19) It is difficult to know which of these sources or whether all or any of them contributed to Waley's assessment.
Cardinals Sean O'Malley and Donald Wuerl, and noted canonists Italian Cardinal Francesco Coccopalmerio and Maltese Archbishop Charles Scicluna.
In fact, the premodern Scholastic authors (theologians, canonists, philosophers) generated a coherent structure encompassing a religious vision of the human being and his transcendental end, philosophical theories (mainly theories of justice and virtue), and a juridical corpus (canon and civil laws) that proved to be of remarkable significance for the history of private law but is still relevant and provides innovative insights in our current age.
The origin of the theme of vengeance is found in the interpretations offered by canonists and the Bible, predominantly in the Old Testament and also, significantly, in the New Testament (for example, Romans 13.
Instead he introduces readers to such figures as the canonists Peter von Osterwald and Josef Pehem, the philosopher Mattaus Fingerlos, and the historian Michael Ignaz Schmidt--hardly household names, even for students of the German Enlightenment.
1140-1500"; and 4) "Canonists in Conversation with the Wider World." The year 1140, noted in three of these headings, is the traditional date for Gratian's Decretum, the work marking the transition between the ius antiquum and the ius novum in medieval canonical jurisprudence.
Macy's arguments about how even the role of abbesses came to be reduced by the combined assemblage of university-trained canonists, theologians, philosophers, and popes are compelling.
The Medieval Origins of the Legal Profession; Canonists, Civilians and Courts.
"Our consultations with moral theologians and canonists warned us that such steps could raise serious questions about Catholic teaching and the application of canon law," said McCarrick, whose comments were made public eight days later.