canine

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Related to Canine teeth: Eye teeth

canine

 [ka´nīn]
1. pertaining to or characteristic of dogs.
2. cuspid tooth; see tooth.
3. pertaining to a cuspid (canine) tooth.

ca·nine

(kā'nīn),
1. Relating to a dog.
2. Relating to the canine teeth.
3. Synonym(s): canine tooth
4. Referring to the cuspid tooth.
[L. caninus]

canine

/ca·nine/ (ka´nīn)
1. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of a dog.

canine

(kā′nīn)
adj.
Of, relating to, or being one of the pointed conical teeth located between the incisors and the first bicuspids.
n.
One of the pointed, conical teeth located between the incisors and the first bicuspids. Also called cuspid.

canine

adjective Referring to a canine tooth or teeth.

noun One of the four pointed fang-like teeth locate on either side of the incisors in the human mouth.

Pronunciation
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, CAN eye’n
Medspeak-US: pronounced, CANE eye’n

ca·nine

(kā'nīn)
1. Relating to the dog.
2. Relating to the canine teeth.
3. Synonym(s): canine tooth.
4. Referring to the cuspid tooth.
[L. caninus]

ca·nine

(kā'nīn)
1. Relating to the canine teeth.
2. Synonym(s): canine tooth.
3. Referring to the cuspid tooth.
[L. caninus]

canine (kā´nīn),

n one of the four pointed teeth situated one on each side of each jaw, distal to the lateral incisor; forms the keystone of the arch. Older term is
cuspid.
canine eminence
n a bony projection that covers the root of the canine tooth on the labial surface of the maxillary arch.
canine fossa,
canine guidance,
n a concept of occlusal function in which the canine teeth are assigned a major control role in the excursive movements of the mandible.

canine

1. pertaining to or characteristic of dogs.
2. pertaining to a canine tooth (cuspid). See also teeth, dog.

canine acidophil-cell hepatitis
an acute or chronic hepatitis reported in dogs in Great Britain, distinct from that caused by infectious canine hepatitis virus, characterized by the histopathologic presence of acidophil cells. Chronic active hepatitis and sometimes hepatocellular carcinoma may occur. The cause is unknown, but a viral etiology is suspected.
canine adenovirus
type 1 (CAV-1) causes infectious canine hepatitis; type 2 (CAV-2) is one cause of canine respiratory disease complex (kennel cough).
canine babesiosis
hemolytic disease of dogs caused by Babesia canis or B. gibsoni, transmitted by a tick, and characterized by anemia and hemoglobinuria. Called also tick fever, malignant jaundice.
canine cognitive dysfunction syndrome
age-related deterioration of cognitive functions characterized by behavioral changes, disorientation, reduced level of interaction with others, and loss of sensory perception.
canine erythrocyte antigen (CEA)
nomenclature revised to dog erythrocyte antigen (DEA).
canine gastrointestinal hemorrhage syndrome
see canine hemorrhagic gastroenteritis.
canine herpesvirus infection
a cause of a generalized, acute, rapidly fatal disease in neonatal puppies. In puppies older than 3 weeks and adults, mild to inapparent upper respiratory disease or vesicular genital lesions occur. The difference in age susceptibility is attributed to the temperature-dependent growth characteristics of the virus in that the optimum temperature for viral replication is about 91°F (33°C) so that puppies that are hypothermic develop severe, often fatal disease. Recovered puppies or dogs may have persistence of the virus in the genital or respiratory tracts.
canine hip dysplasia
see hip dysplasia.
canine hypertrophic osteodystrophy
see hypertrophic osteodystrophy.
canine hypoxic rhabdomyolysis
see exertional rhabdomyolysis.
infectious canine hepatitis
see infectious canine hepatitis.
canine juvenile cellulitis
see juvenile pyoderma.
canine juvenile osteodystrophy
see nutritional secondary hyperparathyroidism.
canine laryngotracheitis
canine nasal mites
see pneumonyssuscaninum.
canine papillomatosis
see canine viral papillomatosis.
canine respiratory disease
see canine distemper, kennel cough.
canine rickettsiosis
see canine ehrlichiosis.
canine secretory alloantigen
see canine secretory alloantigen system.
canine tracheobronchitis
canine tropical pancytopenia
see canine ehrlichiosis.
canine venereal tumor
see canine transmissible venereal tumor.
canine viral hepatitis
see infectious canine hepatitis.
canine viral papillomatosis
see canine viral papillomatosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Figure 2: Laterolateral (oblique) head radiography of a maned wolf showing two unerupted maxillary canine teeth (the red arrow) and an unerupted right mandibular canine tooth (the blue arrow).
Another example, one remarked on by Charles Darwin, is the appearance in some human mouths of large, ape-like canine teeth.
Specific carcass parts prohibited from being imported into PA by hunters are: head (including brain, tonsils, eyes, and retropharyngeal lymph nodes); spinal cord/backbone; spleen; skull plate with attached antlers and cape, if visible brain or spinal cord material is present; upper canine teeth, if root structure or other soft material is present; any object or article containing visible brain or spinal cord material; and brain-tanned hides.
Its skull can be distinguished from other mammals' by the large number of teeth--a total of 50 in an adult, including 10 upper and 8 lower incisors, large canine teeth, and a number of grinding teeth.
Dear Editor, - Regarding Claire Briscoe's call for us to eat "kind" meat (Post, Feb 16), I have a dentist friend who avers that if we had not been intended to eat meat we would not have developed canine teeth.
Grasp the upper jaw with one hand and insert your thumb and forefinger behind the canine teeth.
There is increasing international demand for hippo canine teeth in the illegal ivory trade," WWF said.
Its name describes the two tusk-like canine teeth they used to kill prey.
A very large canine tooth inserted on the distal part of the vomer is considered diagnostic for specific identification; however, one of the examined specimens showed two canine teeth.
The sheep will continue to fear the sheepdog as much as the wolf until they evolve canine teeth of their own.

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