cancer cluster

(redirected from Cancer clusters)
A cancer that occurs in a group of people living or working in a geographically defined region who may share one or more environmental factors—e.g., DES by their mothers— and a characteristic lesion—e.g., vaginal adenocarcinoma—in common
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

cancer cluster

Epidemiology A cancer that occurs in a group of people living or working in a geographically defined region who may share one or more environmental factors–eg, DES, and a characteristic lesion–eg, vaginal adenoCA, in common. See Clusters.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cancer cluster

The occurrence of many cancers in a small geographical area or a defined population in much greater numbers than would be expected through chance alone.
See also: cluster
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
"Cancer clusters are common, but to find a cause for them is very rare.
Investigating suspected cancer clusters and responding to community concerns: guidelines from CDC and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists.
The rubber crumb, which is made from recycled car tyres, has been linked to cancer clusters.
Health departments across the country receive an average of 1,000 reports of possible cancer clusters every year.
The Welsh Government directed us to Public Health Wales, a spokesman for which said it was liaising with local health teams covering Traswfynydd to see whether any cancer clusters had been identified in the area.
There is also growing anecdotal evidence for cancer clusters forming around them.
A new toolkit on how to talk with communities about suspected cancer clusters is now available.
Examples of large-scale military investigations of potential cancer clusters include investigation of skin and respiratory cancers associated with exposure to mustard agents during World War II testing programs, 4-6 various cancers due to ground water contamination involving contaminants like benzene and volatile organic compounds at Camp LeJeune, NC, (7,8) the risk of developing cancer after exposure to Agent Orange in the Vietnam War, (9-13) and risk of cancer mortality after exposure to radiation during nuclear weapons testing.
The Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) has devoted significant resources to environmental justice efforts, including helping to identify cancer clusters in poor communities near heavy industry.
According to the Telegraph, environmentalists have long campaigned for the government to recognize and help the hundreds of cancer clusters caused by poisoned soil, water or air.
Residents voiced their concerns of "cancer clusters" in Bootle and Litherland last year.