Canadian C-spine rule

Canadian C-spine rule

A prediction rule consisting of a cluster of signs and symptoms that help to rule out the need for a radiograph to diagnose a spinal fracture in a patient who comes to the emergency department after receiving an injury to the head or neck.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Canadian C-spine rule versus the NEXUS low-risk criteria in patients with trauma.
The Canadian C-spine rule performs better than unstructured physician judgment.
A good red-flag screen for the cervical spine would include utilizing the Canadian C-Spine Rules.
The results of this study suggest that the Canadian C-spine rule has the potential to affect healthcare costs considerably.
The Ottawa group have previously examined the acceptability of the Canadian C-spine rule to clinicians (Brehaut et al 2009).
The Canadian C-Spine Rule for Radiography in Alert and Stable Trauma Patients" is another prospective cohort study investigating this issue.
New research shows that the Canadian C-spine Rule (CCR) is a better way to determine which trauma patients should undergo cervical spine radiography than criteria developed by the National Emergency X-Radiation Utilization Study (NEXUS).
The researchers then developed the Canadian C-Spine rule from the collection of the clinical findings that consists of 3 main questions: (1) Is there any high risk factor present that mandates radiography?
The Canadian C-Spine rule shows promise as an aid to decide whether to use C-spine radiography in alert stable patients with head or neck injuries.
The Canadian C-Spine Rules (CCSR) and the National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Group (NEXUS) have been designed to help establish whether or not low-risk patients require cervical spine imaging.
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