Campylobacter

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Campylobacter

 [kam´pĭ-lo-bak″ter]
a genus of gram-negative, microaerophilic to anaerobic, motile, curved or spiral rod-shaped bacteria, found in the oral cavity, intestinal tract, and reproductive organs of humans and animals. Certain subspecies of C. fe´tus are agents of acute gastroenteritis and can cause systemic infection in immunocompromised persons. C. pylo´ri is now known as Helicobacter pylori.

Campylobacter

(kam'pi-lō-bak'ter),
A genus of bacteria containing gram-negative, nonsporeforming, spiral or S-curved rods with a single flagellum at one or both ends of the cell; cells may also become spheric under adverse conditions; they are motile with a corkscrewlike motion and nonsaccharolytic. The type species is Campylobacter fetus.
[G. campylos, curved, + baktron, staff or rod]

Campylobacter

A genus of gently-curved gram-negative rods that are common zoonotic commensals found in the GI tracts of wild and domesticated animals, and cause 3 types of human disease: enteric–eg, diarrhea, typically by C jejuni, extraintestinal, most often by C fetus, and gastric, due to C pylori, re-classified as Helicobacter pylori; human infections are attributed to contaminated water or food. See Helicobacter pylori.

Cam·py·lo·bac·ter

(kam'pi-lō-bak'tĕr)
A genus of bacteria containing gram-negative, non-spore-forming, curved spiral rods with a single polar flagellum at one or both ends of the cell; they are motile with a characteristic corkscrewlike motion.
[G. campylos, curved, + baktron, staff or rod]

Cam·py·lo·bac·ter

(kam'pi-lō-bak'tĕr)
A genus of bacteria containing gram-negative, nonspore-forming, spiral or S-curved rods.
[G. campylos, curved, + baktron, staff or rod]
References in periodicals archive ?
Dogs, especially puppies, are a known source of sporadic Campylobacter infections in humans, but are uncommonly reported to cause outbreaks.
All the macrolide-resistant isolates detected also showed resistance to quinolones, highlighting the need of new antimicrobial agents to treat Campylobacter infections.
Campylobacter infection in wild artiodactyl species from southern Spain: Occurrence, risk factors and antimicrobial susceptibility.
While direct contact with infected pets is a risk factor, the actual importance of pets as a source of Campylobacter infections in the general human population remains unclear.
Data Source: A survey of 189 individuals with a history of Salmonella or Campylobacter infection.
The next two sections describe the clinical and epidemiological aspects of Campylobacter infections, pathogenesis, and immunity.
Consumers can avoid Campylobacter infections by washing their hands, utensils and surfaces thoroughly during and after handling raw chicken, and cooking it to 160 degrees F.
SAN DIEGO -- Cases of Campylobacter infections in the United States declined by an average of 30% between 1996 and 2006, according to an epidemiologist from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
* Campylobacter infections have very marked seasonal cycles, but chicken consumption does not.
Fluoroquinolone use in poultry production selects for fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter populations and is associated with an increase in fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter infections in humans via poultry exposure (Gupta et al.
Farmers use the antibiotic in poultry to control other bacteria, but most birds have asymptomatic Campylobacter infections. When exposed to enrofloxacin, those microbes develop resistance to some antibiotics.
The proportion of Campylobacter infections that are resistant to Cipro and other drugs in its class has increased significantly--to 21 percent, according to a 2002 study--since the use of Baytril in poultry was approved in the United States.

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