Campylobacter

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Campylobacter

 [kam´pĭ-lo-bak″ter]
a genus of gram-negative, microaerophilic to anaerobic, motile, curved or spiral rod-shaped bacteria, found in the oral cavity, intestinal tract, and reproductive organs of humans and animals. Certain subspecies of C. fe´tus are agents of acute gastroenteritis and can cause systemic infection in immunocompromised persons. C. pylo´ri is now known as Helicobacter pylori.

Campylobacter

(kam'pi-lō-bak'ter),
A genus of bacteria containing gram-negative, nonsporeforming, spiral or S-curved rods with a single flagellum at one or both ends of the cell; cells may also become spheric under adverse conditions; they are motile with a corkscrewlike motion and nonsaccharolytic. The type species is Campylobacter fetus.
[G. campylos, curved, + baktron, staff or rod]

Campylobacter

/Cam·py·lo·bac·ter/ (kam´pĭ-lo-bak´ter) a genus of bacteria, family Spirillaceae, made up of gram-negative, non–spore-forming, motile, spirally curved rods, which are microaerophilic to anaerobic. C. jeju´ni, C. co´li, and certain subspecies of C. fe´tus can cause gastroenteritis; C. rec´tus is associated with periodontal disease..

Campylobacter

Etymology: Gk, campylos, curved, bakterion, small staff
a genus of bacteria found in the family Spirillaceae. The organisms consist of gram-negative, nonspore-forming, spirally curved motile rods that have a single polar flagellum at either or both ends of the cell. They move in a characteristic coillike motion. The organisms are microaerophiles, requiring little or no oxygen for growth. The type species is C. fetus, which consists of several subspecies that cause human infections, as well as abortion and infertility in cattle. Also called Vibrio fetus.
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Campylobacter

Campylobacter

A genus of gently-curved gram-negative rods that are common zoonotic commensals found in the GI tracts of wild and domesticated animals, and cause 3 types of human disease: enteric–eg, diarrhea, typically by C jejuni, extraintestinal, most often by C fetus, and gastric, due to C pylori, re-classified as Helicobacter pylori; human infections are attributed to contaminated water or food. See Helicobacter pylori.

Cam·py·lo·bac·ter

(kam'pi-lō-bak'tĕr)
A genus of bacteria containing gram-negative, non-spore-forming, curved spiral rods with a single polar flagellum at one or both ends of the cell; they are motile with a characteristic corkscrewlike motion.
[G. campylos, curved, + baktron, staff or rod]
Campylobacter a genus of Gram-negative, flagellate bacteria that cause gut infections; a rare trigger of Guillaine-Barré syndrome

Cam·py·lo·bac·ter

(kam'pi-lō-bak'tĕr)
A genus of bacteria containing gram-negative, nonspore-forming, spiral or S-curved rods.
[G. campylos, curved, + baktron, staff or rod]

Campylobacter

a genus of bacteria, family Spirillaceae, made up of gram-negative, non-spore-forming, motile, comma-shaped rods, which are microaerophilic to anaerobic. Members of the genus were previously classified as Vibrio spp. and many of the diseases caused by these species are still referred to as vibriosis.

Campylobacter coli
a commensal of the gastrointestinal tract of poulty, pigs and humans; can cause enteritis in pigs and humans.
Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus
causes ovine genital campylobacteriosis and abortion in sheep and cattle.
Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis
causes bovine vibriosis, also known as epizootic bovine infertility.
Campylobacter hyointestinalis, Campylobacter mucosalis
associated with the porcine intestinal adenomatosis complex, proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy, necrotic enteritis.
Campylobacter jejuni
causes abortion in sheep and enteritis in dogs, cats and other animals. An important food-borne cause of enteritis in humans, and the cause of avian vibrionic hepatitis.
Campylobacter sputorum subsp. bubulus, Campylobacter sputorum biovar fecalis
found in cattle and sheep, but not known to cause disease.
Campylobacter upsaliensis
may be associated with diarrhea in dogs and humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
Campylobacter infection in poultry-processing workers, Virginia, USA, 2008-2011.
While direct contact with infected pets is a risk factor, the actual importance of pets as a source of Campylobacter infections in the general human population remains unclear.
In almost all developed countries the incidence of human campylobacter infections has been steadily increasing for several years, while it has continued to wax and wane in the UK.
Those are key Findings from an analysis of data from the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet), which began tracking Campylobacter infections in 1996, reported the CDC's Mary E.
Summary of anomalies to chicken as only source of campylobacter infections
Fluoroquinolone use in poultry production selects for fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter populations and is associated with an increase in fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter infections in humans via poultry exposure (Gupta et al.
Farmers use the antibiotic in poultry to control other bacteria, but most birds have asymptomatic Campylobacter infections.
The proportion of Campylobacter infections that are resistant to Cipro and other drugs in its class has increased significantly--to 21 percent, according to a 2002 study--since the use of Baytril in poultry was approved in the United States.
The estimated incidence of Campylobacter infections decreased by 31%, Cryptosporidium by 40%, STEC O157 by 42%, Listeria by 40%, Yersinia by 45%, and overall Salmonella infections by 8%.
coli O157:H7 infections has declined 42 percent since 1996, while Campylobacter infections have dropped 28 percent and Salmonella infections have decreased by 17 percent.
Dr Bob Adak of the PHLS said: "More needs to be done to tackle campylobacter infections if food poisoning is to be cut.
Until now, diagnosing Campylobacter infections or identifying the bacterium in food involved weeks of culturing.

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