CAMO

(redirected from Camoes)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

CAMO

Abbreviation for:
Canadian Association of Medical Oncologists
Chief Administrative Medical Officer (Medspeak-UK)
References in periodicals archive ?
A piece of written propaganda, it is understandable why Reynold won the Premio Camoes since Salazar was craving international recognition and acceptance of his politics.
Meihuizen se teksontledings toon in welke mate Camoes se werk gerig word deur die ordenende sisteem van die Renaissance (similitude) met sy medierende mitologiee wat 'n konseptuele kontinuum tussen Europa en Afrika impliseer.
The sections of the essay on Camoes and Os Lusiadas (and even more so in a later talk on Camoes, to be discussed shortly) show a thorough knowledge of the Portuguese national poem but also of Camoes's other work, as well as a familiarity with details of his biography.
The others relate, respectively, to each of the "private" sonneteers mentioned: a key that the incomparable Shakespeare used to unlock his heart; a lute which gave comfort to a disconsolate Petrarch after his Laura's death; a pipe whose melody solaced a near-mad Tasso in confinement and a grieving Camoes in exile; a myrtle leaf, the emblem of Dante's love for Beatrice, which served to brighten the cypress crown of mourning worn by that supreme poet; and a glow-worm lamp retrieved by Spenser from the land of faerie to light his way as an English civil servant in an ungovernable Ireland.
The Camoes Institute is a crucial element in the system that is in the process of being organized.
Luis Vaz de Camoes (1524-1580), the great Portuguese epic poet wrote in the tenth canto of "Os Lusiadas":
Perhaps the presence of the great Portuguese poet Luis de Camoes in early Macao emphasises the spirit of the city, for here, some suggest, he composed the closing stanzas of his epic Os Lusiades.
Not all of the writers considered had direct knowledge of Camoes or of his poetry, and thus the careful tracing of the ways by which individual writers come to be attracted by the figure of Camoes is crucial.
An attractive literature teacher (Bio Nunes) helps him discover the poetry of Camoes.
For Kenneth Maxwell, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, the founder of the Camoes Center for the Study of the Portuguese-Speaking World, and a long-time observer of Portuguese politics, analyses of the Portuguese transition to date have "homogenized" Portugal's transition within a comparative framework that has obscured the true nature of the transition.
On the Iberian peninsula, in the sixteenth century, Camoes and Ercilla had invented the modern national epic, based on the recent explorations and conquests of new worlds.
Other authors, from Tasso and Camoes to Hobbes are also extensively discussed.