Camellia

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Camellia

includes Camellia japonica, C. susanqua; one of the two plants known to reflect the fluorine content of the soil on which it grows (the other is the tea plant (C. sinensis)). It may contain as much as 2000 ppm of fluorine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike some camellias which hang on to faded blossoms and hence can look messy, these drop their blooms after flowering and form pretty carpets on the ground.
Camellia japonica are especially interesting, often producing flowers that resemble those of the anemone, peony, or even roses.
Lady of the Camellias, which is inspired by Alexandre Dumas' successful novel, was choreographed by John Neumeier with music by Frederic Chopin.
Camellias are typically reliable in the Virginia Beach region, so I suspect that other factors are making the camellia more susceptible--much like you are more likely to catch the flu when tired.
Camellias are not at their best in excessively rich soils.
This variety has an unwarranted reputation for being somewhat temperamental and susceptible to cold, but around almost every old home place and in the older sections of town, established camellias that have survived for decades seem to thrive in spite of the unpredictable vicissitudes of weather.
Indeed, the story behind the park does have Hollywood potential: a couple of gardeners have a deep love of camellias and, while working for the Locarno Parks Department, they spend every bit of free time fiddling about with the flowers, experimenting with cuttings and propagating--all the things gardeners do best.
The most frustrating phenomenon to be seen on camellias is not the result of a disease but of a physiological disorder.
Camellias come in a wide range of colours from pure white, through pink and rose, to deep reds.
A shady, sheltered, north-facing spot is perfect - and camellias are just the ticket for brightening up such a dull area
During a survey of commercial nurseries, California state pathologists found the sudden oak death pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum, first on camellias at a Monrovia Nursery site east of Los Angeles and then on camellias at Specialty Plants nursery in San Diego County.
Camellias are among the few A-list megastars of the garden.