calcar

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Related to Calques: loan translation

calcar

 [kal´kar]
1. spur.
2. a spur-shaped structure.
calcar a´vis an eminence on the medial wall of the occipital horn of the lateral ventricle, below the bulb of the occipital horn, produced by lateral extension of the calcarine sulcus.

cal·car

(kal'kar), [TA]
1. A small projection from any structure; internal spurs (septa) at the level of division of arteries and confluence of veins when branches or roots form an acute angle.
See also: vascular spur.
2. A dull spine or projection from a bone.
Synonym(s): spur [TA]
[L. spur, cock's spur]

calcar

/cal·car/ (kal´kar)
1. spur.
2. a spur-shaped structure.

calcar a´vis  the lower of the two medial elevations in the posterior horn of the lateral cerebral ventricle, produced by the lateral extension of the calcarine sulcus.

calcar

(kăl′kär′)
n. pl. calcaria (kăl-kâr′ē-ə)
A spur or spurlike projection, such as one found on the base of a petal or on the wing or leg of a bird.

calcar

[kal′kär] pl. calcaria,
a spur or a structure that resembles a spur.

cal·car

(kal'kahr) [TA]
1. A small projection from any structure; internal spurs (septa) at the level of division of arteries and confluence of veins when branches or roots form an acute angle.
2. A spine or projection from a bone.
Synonym(s): spur.
[L. spur, rooster's spur]

calcar

A spur or spur-like projection from a bone or tendon.

cal·car

(kal'kahr) [TA]
Dull spine or projection from a bone.
[L. spur, rooster's spur]

calcar

a spur or spur-shaped structure.

calcar avis
the lower of two medial elevations in the lateral cerebral ventricle, produced by the lateral extension of the calcarine sulcus; called also hippocampus minor.
calcar metacarpale, calcar metatarsale
see ergot2.
References in periodicals archive ?
This stage is primarily aimed to identify contextualized Neocolonial anglicisms and calques, and to describe them diasynchronically.
Keywords: Anglicisms, calque, loan, neologisms, vocabulary.
Among the attested examples, this word exists as a borrowing proper (word), it can undergo a partial morphological assimilation (augmentation-wordzicho, tordzicho); at times one can find a linguistic calque (stowo).
Some calques in the text of the laws were only partial.
The calques, the loan-translations from English, show the status of the Spanish language within the Garcia family.
The author rightly distinguishes between a calque (she does not use this classic term, which is more precise, however, than those she found in the literature) and a borrowing and rightly summons the Gumperz and Wilson example of INC being brought from Marathi into neighboring languages, an example she cleverly opposes to the widespread idea that calques induce systems to simplify.
In linguistic terms, this means to adhere to the SL structure and syntax, to use calques, archaisms, etc.
An authoritative review of the Bretonisms in his language was long overdue, and sets us straight on calques, syntax, lexical exoticism, supposed "mistakes" and so forth.
It should be stressed here that the vocabulary of the traditional Yiddish Bible translation language includes no Hebrew elements at all, but consists mainly of genetically Germanic calques, taken partly from Hebrew, partly from the language of the older Judeo-French Bible translation of Sephardic Jewry.
In his translations Bird succeeds in remaining as faithful as possible to terms given very specific meanings in the context of the debate in which they are used: not an easy task, as many are calques of terms borrowed or developed from other philosophies or traditions.
Should they keep the flavor of the original by means of loans, transliterations, calques and other techniques, of should they convert the means of expressing meaning of the original source text into the usual, idiomatic ways of the target audience, language and text?