calorie

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calorie

 [kal´o-re]
any of several units of heat defined as the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 kilogram of water by 1 degree Celsius (1°C) at a specified temperature. The calorie used in chemistry and biochemistry is equal to 4.184 joules. Symbol cal. See also nutrition.

In referring to the energy content of foods it is customary to use the “large calorie,” which is equal to 1 kilocalorie (kcal). Every bodily process, including the building up of cells, motion of the muscles, and the maintenance of body temperature, requires energy, which the body derives from the food it consumes. Digestive processes reduce food to usable “fuel,” which the body “burns” in the complex chemical reactions that sustain life. The amount of energy required for these chemical processes varies. Factors such as weight, age, activity, and metabolic rate determine a person's daily calorie requirement. Nutrition experts have computed daily calorie requirements in terms of age and other factors. These tabulations serve only as guides; they cannot, of course, embrace all individual variations.

From its daily intake of energy foods, the body uses only the amount it needs for energy purposes. The remainder is stored as fat. If the average adult consumes more calories than the daily requirement, he or she will gain weight. However, if consumption is less than recommended daily requirements, the body will supplement its energy sources by drawing upon stores of fat and the person will lose weight.

cal·o·rie

(kal'ō-rē), As used in nutrition and dietetics, this word ordinarily means kilogram calorie (kilocalorie).
A unit of heat content or energy. The amount of heat necessary to raise 1 g of water from 14.5-15.5°C (small calorie). Calorie is being replaced by joule, the SI unit equal to 0.239 calorie.
See also: British thermal unit.
Synonym(s): calory
[L. calor, heat]

calorie

(kăl′ə-rē)
n.
1. Abbr. cal Any of several approximately equal units of heat, each measured as the quantity of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water by 1°C at 1 atmosphere pressure. Also called gram calorie, small calorie.
2. Abbr. cal The unit of heat equal to 1/100 the quantity of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water from 0 to 100°C at 1 atmosphere pressure. Also called mean calorie.
3.
a. Abbr. Cal The unit of heat equal to the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 kilogram of water by 1°C at 1 atmosphere pressure. Also called kilocalorie, kilogram calorie, large calorie.
b. A unit of energy-producing potential equal to this amount of heat that is contained in food and released upon oxidation by the body. Also called nutritionist's calorie.
Chemistry A unit of measurement defined as 4.184 absolute joules—the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water from 15º to 16ºC
Nutrition Food calories equal to 1,000 calories—i.e., 1 food calorie = 1 kilocalorie

calorie

Chemistry A unit of measurement defined as 4.184 absolute joules–the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water from 15º to 16ºC Nutrition Food calories equal to 1,000 calories–ie, 1 food calorie = 1 kilocalorie. See Empty calorie, Exchange list, Meal plan.

cal·o·rie

(kal'ŏr-ē)
A unit of heat content or energy. The amount of heat necessary to raise 1 g of water from 14.5-15.5°C (small calorie). Calorie is being replaced by joule, the SI unit equal to 0.239 calorie.
See also: British thermal unit
[L. calor, heat]

calorie

The amount of heat needed to raise 1 g of water by 1 C. For nutritional purposes the Calorie (or kilocalorie) is the amount of heat needed to raise 1000 grams of water by 1 C. The modern unit is the joule. 1 calorie is a little over 4 joules.

calorie

the heat required to raise 1 g (1 cm3) of water through 1 °C (i.e. from 14.5 °C to 15.5 °C). A Calorie (with a capital C) is used sometimes to denote a kilocalorie. The calorie was formerly used as a unit of energy content or output, but is now largely superseded by the SI unit joule (4.19 J = 1 cal).

Calorie

A unit of heat measurement used in nutrition to measure the energy value of foods. A calorie is the amount of heat energy needed to raise the temperature of 1 kilogram of water 1°C.
Mentioned in: Malnutrition

cal·o·rie

(kal'ŏr-ē) As used in nutrition and dietetics, this word ordinarily means kilogram calorie (kilocalorie).
Unit of heat content or energy; amount of heat necessary to raise 1 g of water from 14.5-15.5°C (small calorie).
[L. calor, heat]

Patient discussion about calorie

Q. In which sports do you burn the most calories? I heard that in a spinning session you can burn up to 1000 calories and that Bikram yoga is also very good for burning lots of calories. Do you know of other sports?

A. Running and cycling are considered high-expenditure sports. Generally, the higher you get your pulse during the exercise the higher your calorie expenditure is. However, the burning fat is optimal at a certain pulse, usually not the highest you can get yourself to.

You may read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/exerciseandphysicalfitness.html

Q. Low calorie desserts - any suggestions? I’m having my in-laws for a dinner next week, and since my husband has started a diet lately I’m looking for a low-calorie desserts to end the low-fat meal I’m preparing. Any idea?

A. You can find suggestions and recipes here:
(http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/lf_hl_low_calorie/0,2661,FOOD_21616,00.html )

Q. Is it true that alcohol has lots of calories? if so, then how can it be that people who are alcoholics are not all very fat?

A. Alcohol carries about 7 Kcal per gram. 1 gram of fat gives 9 kcal & 1 gram of carbohydrate gives 4 kcal. but vast amount of alcohol can suppress the need for food, so they can pass out every afternoon and forget eating. obesity is a better situation. trust me.

More discussions about calorie
References in periodicals archive ?
Here's more evidence that you should look beyond calories when judging a food: In a trial published in the New England Journal of Medicine people whose diets included more servings of potato chips, potatoes, sweetened drinks, and red or processed meats gained more weight during 4-year intervals while those who ate more vegetables, fruits, nuts, whole grains, and yogurt were protected from creeping weight gain.
SWAP: A 75g jam doughnut (252 calories) for a slice of toast with 7g of butter and 15g of jam (151 calories) SAVING: 101 calories SWAP: One 70g scone with 10g butter and 1 tbsp of jam (341 calories) for a 70g slice of rich fruit cake (225 calories).
Beverage consumption was largely unaffected by calorie posting.
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Surveys suggest that we're eating more in ounces, in calories, and in calories per ounce (calorie density).
If more calories are consumed than expended, it will produce an increase in weight.
Bloom's team fed 20 normal-weight and 20 heavy adults milkshakelike meals packed with anywhere from 250 to 3,000 calories. In the February JCE&M, the London researchers reported that ghrelin concentrations fell with increasing calories only among the normal-weight men and women.
Garden of Eatin' whole wheat tortilla can be replaced with any tortilla providing 125-150 calories; however, women should choose a brand providing 6% of the DV for iron.
Calories, you may know, are a measure of the energy in food.
Manufacturers have reduced the sugar, salt, fat and calories in products and there is now a greater variety of healthier products available to shoppers than ever before."