calamus

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cal·a·mus

(kal'ă-mŭs),
1. The dried, unpeeled rhizome of Acorus calamus (family Araceae), cultivated in Myanmar (Burma) and Sri Lanka, a carminative and anthelmintic.
2. A reed-shaped structure.
[L. reed, a pen]

calamus

/cal·a·mus/ (kal´ah-mus) a reed or reedlike structure.
calamus scripto´rius  the lowest portion of the floor of the fourth ventricle, situated between the restiform bodies.

calamus

(kăl′ə-məs)
n. pl. cala·mi (-mī′)
1.
b. The aromatic rhizome of the sweet flag, used for medicinal purposes and yielding an oil used in perfumery.
2. Any of various chiefly tropical Asian climbing palms of the genus Calamus, having strong flexible stems used as a source of rattan.
3. See quill.

sweet flag

A perennial herb, the rhizone of which contains mucilage, sesquiterpenes and volatile oils (azulene, camphor, cineole, eugenol, pinene and others); it is carminative, spasmolytic and mildly sedative.

Chinese medicine
In traditional Chinese medicine, sweet flag has been used for deafness, seizures and vertigo.

Herbal medicine
In Western herbal medicine, sweet flag has been used for fever, gastrointestinal complaints (dyspepsia and flatulence), menstrual disorders, toothache and tobacco addiction.
 
Toxicity
Aserone, one of sweet flag’s volatile oils, is carcinogenic; the FDA has classified sweet flag as “unsafe”.

cal·a·mus

(kal'ă-mŭs)
A reed-shaped structure.
[L. reed, a pen]

calamus

  1. the quill of a feather.
  2. any hollow, nodeless stem.

calamus

in the shape of a reed or pen.

calamus scriptorius
reed-shaped portion of the floor of the fourth ventricle of the brain situated between the restiform bodies.
References in periodicals archive ?
By figuring the psychoactive calamus root as an agent of death, Whitman, like Ludlow, reimagines the drug user's self-absorption as the condition of possibility for sympathy with others and encourages his readers to regard mind-altering substances, not as the means of individual isolation, but as instruments of self-extension.
Nevertheless, the feeling of self-extension that the calamus root induces remains exclusive to the speaker.
This special friendship seems to be the same as the death-like affection that, earlier in the poems, he had claimed was the effect of the calamus root.
Moreover, because the calamus root activates a potential for shared feeling, the speaker can "depict" the New Englander, "the man of the Seaside State," the Pennsylvanian, "the Kanadian," and "the Southerner" as he would depict himself; he can inhabit the mental state of any of his compatriots simply by inhabiting his own.