cafeteria diet

cafeteria diet

An experimental system for studying obesity that allows rats free, “cafeteria-style” access to cookies, candy, cake (”junk-food”).
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One of the ways of inducing obesity in animals--particularly in rodents--is the cafeteria diet, also known as the Western diet.
This does not correlate with the results of study conducted by Pooja et al, who developed cafeteria diet induced obese rat model by administering cafeteria diet for 14 weeks and found significant increase in Lee index.
Animals in groups G1 to G6 received a high-fat diet (HFD, cafeteria diet) for 4 weeks to induce hepatic damage [6].
In experimental animals, cafeteria diet (CAF)-induced obesity closely resembles the human obesity that is induced by overfeeding with high-energy food (SAMPEY et al., 2011).
Obesity can be caused in rats by feeding them hyperenergetic diets, so called "cafeteria diet".
Researchers found that a high-calorie, high-sugar, high-sodium diet nicknamed the 'cafeteria diet' induced most symptoms of metabolic syndrome - a combination of high levels of cholesterol, blood sugar, blood pressure and obesity - in rats after only two months.
A diet with high levels of fat and carbohydrates similar to fast food (cafeteria diet) has considerable implications for the onset of obesity, leading to body weight gain, body fat deposition and associated problems, reflecting a non-genetic model of animal obesity (CESARETTI; KOLHMANN JR., 2006).
Results showed pronounced dose-dependent appetite suppressant and antiobesogenic effects on a sample of rats fed a cafeteria diet. For further information: www.gencorpacific.com
The rats were fed with one of two diets as follows: One group (n=12) received standard chow produced by Nuvital Nutrients Ltda (NUVILAB-CR1) (Colombo, PR, Brazil)O, The other group (n=12), received a high fat diet (cafeteria diet) (Rotchell & Stock, 1981; Prats et al., 1989) formulated by Nutrition and Metabolism Laboratory of Federal University of Sao Carlos (DEFMH/CCBS/UFSCAR).
In rats fed ascorbic acid, vitamin C "was able to protect against high-fat-diet effects, reducing the increase of body weight, total body fat, and enlargement of different adipose deposits induced by the cafeteria diet," the researchers concluded.
The cafeteria diet induced an average weight difference of 32 g and an overall increase in body weight in the experimental groups occurred at a