cadmium

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cadmium

 (Cd) [kad´me-um]
a chemical element, atomic number 48. (See Appendix 6.) Inhalation of cadmium fumes causes pulmonary edema with proliferative interstitial pneumonia and various degrees of lung damage. Cadmium poisoning may occur due to occupational exposure, smoking, and ingestion of certain foods (kidneys and livers; seafoods such as mussels, oysters, and crabs; and some grains). Maternal cadmium exposure can cause abnormal embryonic development by interfering with normal zinc ion metabolic activities.

cad·mi·um (Cd),

(kad'mē-ŭm),
A metallic element, atomic no. 48, atomic wt. 112.411; its salts are poisonous and little used in medicine but are frequently used in the basic sciences. Various compounds of cadmium are used commercially in metallurgy, photography, and electrochemistry; a few have been used as ascaricides, antiseptics, and fungicides.
[L. cadmia, fr. G. kadmeia or kadmia, an ore of zinc, calamine]

cadmium

A toxic divalent metallic element (atomic number 48, atomic weight 112.411), which is ubiquitous in nature and central to many industrial processes. Most cadmium is used for rechargeable batteries; it is also used in electroplating, nuclear fission, TV tubes, photocopier drums and paint pigments (yellow and red). It has no known physiologic role in higher animals.

Ref range
0–5.0 µg/L.
 
Toxic range
> 100 µg/L.

cad·mi·um

(Cd) (kad'mē-ŭm)
A metallicelement, atomic no. 48, atomic wt. 112.411; its salts are poisonous and little used in medicine. Various compounds of cadmium are used commercially in fields such as metallurgy, photography, and electrochemistry; a few have been used as ascaricides, antiseptics, and fungicides.
[L. cadmia, fr. G. kadmeia or kadmia, an ore of zinc, calamine]

cadmium

A poisonous metal sometimes encountered as an air pollutant in industrial processes. Inhaled cadmium dust can cause lung inflammation. Cadmium is also damaging to the kidneys and can cause softening of the bones (OSTEOMALACIA).

cad·mi·um

(kad'mē-ŭm)
Metallic element; its salts are poisonous and little used in medicine but are frequently employed in the basic sciences.
[L. cadmia, fr. G. kadmeia or kadmia, an ore of zinc, calamine]
References in periodicals archive ?
In the present work, the preparation of cadmium(II) complexes and the synthesis of cadmium oxide nanoparticles through thermal decomposition of bis(2-hydroxy1-naphthaldehydato)cadmium(II) complex into hexadecylamine (HDA) at different decomposition temperatures is reported.
Deposition of Cadmium Oxide Thin Films by Spin Coating.
The effective approaches to the synthesis of cadmium oxide nanoparticles by thermal decomposition and their thin films using annealing technique are reported.
Huang, "Gold-catalyzed low-temperature growth of cadmium oxide nanowires by vapor transport," Journal of Physical Chemistry B, vol.
Schmitt, "Diffused planar inp bipolar transistor with a cadmium oxide film emitter," Electronics Letters, vol.
Han, "Top-down solid-phase fabrication of nanoporous cadmium oxide architectures," Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol.
Amm, "Fabrication of cadmium oxide thin films usingthe Langmuir-Blodgett deposition technique," Thin Solid Films, vol.
Figure 1 shows the SEM image of synthesized cadmium oxide nanoparticles.
Figure 3a shows the TEM image of carbon paste electrode surface before the construction of cadmium oxide nanoparticles.
These colours simply contain some cadmium oxide in the flux mixture, and are made to blend with the cadmium reds and yellows.
They contain cancer-causing chemicals such as the flame retardant PBDE (polybrominated diphenyl ethers), PCDD (polychlorinated dioxins), barium, copper, lead, zinc, cadmium oxides and cadmium sulphides and trivalent antimony.