cadmium

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cadmium

 (Cd) [kad´me-um]
a chemical element, atomic number 48. (See Appendix 6.) Inhalation of cadmium fumes causes pulmonary edema with proliferative interstitial pneumonia and various degrees of lung damage. Cadmium poisoning may occur due to occupational exposure, smoking, and ingestion of certain foods (kidneys and livers; seafoods such as mussels, oysters, and crabs; and some grains). Maternal cadmium exposure can cause abnormal embryonic development by interfering with normal zinc ion metabolic activities.

cad·mi·um (Cd),

(kad'mē-ŭm),
A metallic element, atomic no. 48, atomic wt. 112.411; its salts are poisonous and little used in medicine but are frequently used in the basic sciences. Various compounds of cadmium are used commercially in metallurgy, photography, and electrochemistry; a few have been used as ascaricides, antiseptics, and fungicides.
[L. cadmia, fr. G. kadmeia or kadmia, an ore of zinc, calamine]

cadmium

A toxic divalent metallic element (atomic number 48, atomic weight 112.411), which is ubiquitous in nature and central to many industrial processes. Most cadmium is used for rechargeable batteries; it is also used in electroplating, nuclear fission, TV tubes, photocopier drums and paint pigments (yellow and red). It has no known physiologic role in higher animals.

Ref range
0–5.0 µg/L.
 
Toxic range
> 100 µg/L.

cad·mi·um

(Cd) (kad'mē-ŭm)
A metallicelement, atomic no. 48, atomic wt. 112.411; its salts are poisonous and little used in medicine. Various compounds of cadmium are used commercially in fields such as metallurgy, photography, and electrochemistry; a few have been used as ascaricides, antiseptics, and fungicides.
[L. cadmia, fr. G. kadmeia or kadmia, an ore of zinc, calamine]

cadmium

A poisonous metal sometimes encountered as an air pollutant in industrial processes. Inhaled cadmium dust can cause lung inflammation. Cadmium is also damaging to the kidneys and can cause softening of the bones (OSTEOMALACIA).

cad·mi·um

(kad'mē-ŭm)
Metallic element; its salts are poisonous and little used in medicine but are frequently employed in the basic sciences.
[L. cadmia, fr. G. kadmeia or kadmia, an ore of zinc, calamine]
References in periodicals archive ?
Three different dose concentrations of cadmium chloride, 6.25, 12.50 and 25.00 ug/g B.W., were given to pregnant mice.
The effect of high dose of cadmium chloride (0.0004 g Cd/0.04 ml) on gizzard of Larus argentatus showed severe damage to mucosa with deranged epithelium and most of cells were observed without nuclei.
Under the impact of 5 x [10.sup.-5] M cadmium chloride solution (Figure 5), the most pronounced protective action was noticed for NAC, which started to appear in the presence of 1 mM NAC (100% survived cells) and increased with increasing concentration.
The same (group3) of mice had higher content of bilirubin (1.65 [+ or -] .08 and Urea) (B, mg/dl) and urea (169.45 [+ or -] 4 U, mg/dl) compared with mice fed on diets containing CdCl2 + ppp (40 g ppp/kg diet), it had content of bilirubin (1.13 [+ or -] .07 and) (B, mg/dl) and urea (142.12 [+ or -] 3.2, mg/dl [20] found that cadmium chloride decreased total plasma protein, increasing excretion of high molecular weight protein (Protein urea).
The groups included the control and cadmium chloride groups (15 and 25 [micro]M/kg).
A mixed aqueous solution of cadmium chloride, thiourea and copper chloride was used as the precursor solution to deposit Cu-doped CdS thin films.
Oral exposure to cadmium chloride triggers an acute inflammatory response in the intestines of mice, initiated bythe over-expression of tissue macrophage inflammatory protein-2 mRNA.
A sintering agent improves the particle-to-particle contact (in the lab, cadmium chloride was used) and permits the nanocrystals to carry out the electron transport effectively.
Cadmium carbonate and cadmium chloride have been used as fungicides for home lawn and golf course turfs.
The source of cadmium ions was aqueous cadmium chloride (Cd[Cl.sub.2] 21/2[H.sub.2]O).
Experiments were performed in control and metallothionein-null mice, injected subcutaneously with a wide range of cadmium chloride doses, six times per week for up to 10 wk.