Trichoptera

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Tri·chop·ter·a

(tri-kop'tĕr-ă),
An order of insects in which the aquatic larvae (caddis flies) construct a protective case (caddis) of bits of submerged material in a highly specific form; commonly found attached under stones in freshwater streams. The adult caddis flies, having hairy wings, shed their hairs and epithelia, causing hay fever-like (allergic) symptoms in sensitive people.
[tricho- + G. pteron, wing]

Trichoptera

the insect order containing the caddis flies. The larvae are aquatic and often live in a case or tube which they carry around; they include herbivores and carnivores and some species act as indicators of pollution. The adults have reduced mouthparts and feed only rarely.
References in periodicals archive ?
Composition and flight periodicity of adult caddisflies in New Zealand hill-country catchments of contrasting land use.
Studies of Neotropical caddisflies, XXXIII: new species from austral South America (Trichoptera).
Chironomids were the most abundant in HPP dams in our study, while caddisflies were found in smaller numbers (Fig.
Southern Appalachian and Other Southeastern Streams at Risk: Implications for Mayflies, Dragonflies, Damselflies, Stoneflies, and Caddisflies.
The students found that a water source that is protected from contamination had increased populations of mayflies, caddisflies, and stoneflies, corroborating that Bison Pond had the highest water quality.
We used the ANOSIM similarity statistical method to analyze data from adult specimens to calculate relative abundance of species and to test for differences between regional assemblages of caddisflies (Clarke, 1993).
Caddisflies (Trichoptera) are among the most diverse primary aquatic insects worldwide, exceeded in the number of species only by aquatic Diptera (Mackay & Wiggins, 1979).
Global diversity of Caddisflies (Trichoptera: Insecta) in freshwater.
Washington, Mar 13 (ANI): Inspired by the larvae of caddisflies that tape things together underwater, scientists are hoping to make synthetic glue that can be used to tape wet tissues together in operating rooms.
Ames, a commercial photographer and fly fisher, presents a guide to the species of caddisflies that fly fishers are most likely to see in the eastern US.