kabbalah

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kabbalah

Paranormal
A system of eclectic mysticism and healing based on ancient Jewish tradition involving angelology, demonology, meditation, prayers and ritual.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Lukumi Babalu Ave formulation is almost cabbalistic in its complexity and is unlikely to prove workable over the long run.
14) See the references within Le Spleen de Paris and its paratext to a "combinaison" (Oc 1: 275, 286), to "l'esprit de mystification" (Oc 1: 286), to "une intrigue" (Oc 1: 275), to hieroglyphics (Oc 1: 311), and cabbalistic numbers (Oc 1: 365).
One paper, by Giulio Busi, deals with bible-based Jewish cabbalistic mysticism culled from the Hebrew alphabet and stands out particularly as an alien element in this already motley collection.
His introduction to cabbalistic thought confronted him with the animosity of cabbalists towards his attempts at making sense of that divine science.
The "holy tree" with its "ignorant leafy" ways and the "fatal image" of a tree with broken branches, having Biblical and cabbalistic parallels, symbolise the objective and the subjective aspects of Maud Gonne respectively.
And then that gave me the licence to imagine the larger things in the book, which is, that, for instance, the French Revolution was begun by a cabbalistic group of former owners of the East India Company, who had made themselves immortal by robotic means and were living in a fossilised dinosaur under London.
For still others, it is cabbalistic and alienating.
A more or less apologetic tone surfaces throughout, as if the authors are aware that what they are doing teeters on the charlatan, or at least the cabbalistic.
Susanna Akerman's "The Gothic Kabbala" is a bricolage of commentary and recondite knowledge about cabbalistic, Rosicrucian and other apocalyptic and mystical directions, mainly in Scandinavia in the seventeenth century: a long way from 1492, or even from its aftermath.
The number of different languages that resulted from this confusion is not given in Genesis, but according to Jewish cabbalistic tradition the number was seventy-two.
Such a restricted concretization of Shekinah, apart from questions about the validity of some of the symbolic equivalencies, makes difficult the visualization of Shekinah as participant in the clearly heterosexual hieros gamos, another central cabbalistic image.
v) individually or in combination with neighbours as symbolic or cabbalistic numbers, the most common of which in Tudor music is 33 (representing Christ, 33 being the age at which Christ was thought to have been crucified); the 33 in the Gloria may be an example, its use here providing a symbolic reminder of the Crucifixion, that is, how Christ took away the sins of the world.