CXCL5


Also found in: Wikipedia.

CXCL5

A gene on chromosome 4q13.3 that encodes an inflammatory chemokine, which is involved in neutrophil activation and co-produced with IL-8 in response to stimulation by either IL-1 or tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha).
References in periodicals archive ?
Andrew Loudon from The University of Manchester said that they have found key molecule known as CXCL5 that facilitates lung inflammation which is a key regulator of how immune cells get into tissues.
Professor Loudon said: "We found a key molecule known as CXCL5 that facilitates lung inflammation which is a key regulator of how immune cells get into tissues.
The molecule, called CXCL5, controls sensitivity to pain from ultraviolet (UV) radiation.
CXCL5 belongs to a family of proteins called chemokines which play a key role in inflammation.
The transcriptional profile of several other chemokines, CXCL1, CXCL5 and CCL5, was investigated.
CXCL5 was not detectable by PCR in any of the cell cultures with or without pathogen incubation.
Now, a new study has shown that obese people have large amounts of the molecule CXCL5, produced by certain cells in fatty tissue.
The results of this new study show that serum levels of a chemokine molecule called CXCL5, produced by certain adipose tissue cells, appear at much high levels in the tissues of obese people than in those of individuals with normal weight.
This has helped Lluis Fajas's research team to come to a biomedically relevant conclusion: "The CXCL5 molecule helps cause insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes".
The researchers behind the study say that an inflammatory protein, known as CXCL5, rises and falls with obesity and subsequent weight loss in humans.
In the current study, the researchers showed that CXCL5 is one of those factors, for it is expressed at high levels in WAT, particularly in immune cells known as macrophages.
They also claimed that CXCL5 is dramatically increased in the blood of people who are obese as compared to those who are lean.