CT myelography

CT myelography

Neuroimaging A technique that combines myelography with CT imaging to evaluate the spinal cord, and related neural and bone structures. See Computed tomography, Magnetic resonance imaging.
References in periodicals archive ?
Alternatively, dedicated spine imaging (such as heavily T2-weighted fat-saturated MRI or CT myelography) may demonstrate direct evidence of a CSF leak.
Although CT myelography is the gold standard method for showing the CSF leakage site, we preferred MR myelography because we did not want to take the risk of increasing CSF hypotension that could have been induced by dural puncture in CT myelography in our comatose patient.
* A recently discovered cause of spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) in some patients is a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-venous fistula, and the hyperdense paraspinal vein sign on CT myelography (CTM) is a recently described sign strongly suggestive of this entity.
As for intrathecal use in CT myelography, first-generation high osmolality contrast agents could not be used due to neurotoxicity.
In CT myelography, the spinal cord is evaluated using an intrathecal contrast agent.
Though lots of imaging modalities are there for the diagnosis of spinal tumours, which includes Plain Radiographs, Contrast Myelography, CT Scan, CT Myelography, none of the above-mentioned modalities are comparable to MRI in evaluation of spinal tumours.
CT myelography remains an alternative method when MRI is unavailable or cannot be used because of uncontrolled pain, patient size, implanted metallic objects, the inability to lay flat during the exam time, or severe claustrophobia.
CT myelography is used in patients who are intolerant of closed spaces or who cannot undergo MRI9.
CT myelography and MR imaging of extramedullary cysts of the spinal canal in adult and pediatric patients.
In this study we looked at three groups: (a) controls representing 16 patients who underwent elective CT myelography, (b) patients considered positive xanthochromia with net bilirubin absorbances >0.015, and (c) patients with equivocal values with net bilirubin absorbances from 0.005 to 0.014.
When performing dynamic CT myelography, patients are positioned prone in Trendelenburg position typically using a large foam wedge with the hips elevated above the craniocervical junction to ensure downward trajectory of contrast flow.