continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion

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continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion

delivery of insulin to subcutaneous tissue by a pump using both continuous and bolus infusions.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion

Abbreviation: CSII
Administration of insulin under the skin continuously with an infusion pump connected to a needle inserted beneath the epidermis.
See: insulin pump
See also: infusion
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Zande et al., "Basal and bolus insulin requirements in children, adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII): effects of age and puberty," Endocrine Practice, vol.
In summary, allergy to soft cannula of insulin pump should be considered when patients with CSII therapy have unexplained progressive rise in blood glucose after excluding other possible causes.
We did not find any significant correlations related to deficits on specific knowledge content areas (data not shown); however, the most common content areas that the parents answered incorrectly (for both MDI and CSII) were medications, nutrition, and chronic complications, respectively.
CSII improves glucose control by providing "background" changes in insulin dosing to match the complexities of metabolism in pregnancy and CGM (as opposed to self-blood glucose monitoring) improves glucose control by removing the fear of unexpected lows, which is a big issue in my patients, and by warning of impending highs.
Comparison of the effects of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) and NPH-based multiple daily insulin injections (MDI) on glycaemic control and quality of life: results of the 5-nations trial.
We hypothesised that CSII could be safer than intravenous infusion because its more delayed action permits early awareness of an eventual trend toward hypoglycaemia.
The popularity of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes has increased, despite limited safety and effectiveness data, in part because many children and teens prefer the customized insulin delivery of a pump rather than multiple daily insulin injections.
(OTCBB: CSII), have announced a strategic partnership.
Results from the study, "CSII Versus Intensive Insulin Therapy at Onset of Type 1 Diabetes: The IMDIAB 8 Two-Year Randomized Trials," show for the first time that the use of insulin pump therapy at the time of diagnosis is associated with the protection of insulin-making beta cells that are still functioning in the body, leading to increased insulin secretion.
For example, a study published last month by Atlanta's Piedmont Hospital found that the company's NovoLog, a rapid-acting insulin analog, maintains good glycemic control when used in continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII, commonly referred to as pump therapy) to treat Type 1 diabetes.
The insulin pump, manufactured by MiniMed[R], is a small programmable device, also known as a Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion or CSII, holds a supply of insulin and can be programmed by the user.