COX-2


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Related to COX-2: Cox-1

COX-2

(kŏks′to͞o′)
n.
One of two isoenzymes that catalyze the conversion of arachidonic acid into prostaglandins. It is specifically induced at sites of inflammation and can be selectively inhibited by certain NSAIDs in order to reduce pain.

COX-2

Cyclooxygenase-2 An enzyme primarily of immune-mediating cells–eg, macrophages, PMNs, and synoviocytes, which converts arachidonic acid into PGs 2º to inflammation. See COX-2 inhibitor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Demonstration of COX-2 in tissue was done by indirect immunoperoxidase method.
We conducted a retrospective study of a cross-sectional historical cohort to evaluate the expression of VEGF and COX-2 markers in SCC of the larynx or hypopharynx and to correlate their expression with tumor size.
As we have indicated that our previous works demonstrated that COX-2 could be an important downstream of [beta]-catenin, we detected the expression of COX-2 in retinopathy caused by NMDA.
COX-2 gene expression could be induced by a variety of growth factors and mitogens (Bakhle and Botting, 1996; Simon et al., 2000) which might lead it to be involved in carcinogenesis of many tumors, while there are few reports of COX-2 gene expression in feline cancers.
Keywords: COX-2, ELISA, IL-6, Inflammation, Warfarin.
Collective evidence in human, animal, and cell culture studies clearly indicates that targeted inhibition of COX-2 is a viable approach for cancer prevention and treatment (PEEK, 2004).
Primers for COX-2 gene (10 exons, all the coding region) and primers for 5' (exon numbers 1, 2 and 12) and 3' region (exon numbers 18, 19, 20, 21 and 22) of BRCA1 gene were designed by primer 3 software.
Meanwhile, the immunohistochemical staining results of COX-2, GLUT-1 and VEGF were recorded.
The COX-1 and COX-2 enzymatic inhibitory rates were performed by incubation of various compounds with human recombinant COX-1 and COX-2 (Cayman Chemical, Ann Arbor, MI).
The study's researchers, in a report published in Carcinogenesis, attributed this effect to curcumin--a natural COX-2 inhibitor--which is also turmeric's active constituent.
The COX-2 gene mediates inflammation, which in most cases helps our bodies eliminate pathogens and damaged cells.